University of Southern Indiana

Course Descriptions

OT 611: Disease and Occupation
This course focuses on the role of occupation throughout the lifespan in relation to the acute and chronic human disease processes. Students will develop critical analysis and problem solving skills relating to the occupational function and dysfunction continuum while exploring therapeutic OT treatment approaches.

OT 623: Psychosocial & Cognitive Strategies
This course emphasizes the examination of appropriate theoretical frameworks, the application of purposeful activities and occupations as therapeutic interventions for both psychosocial and cognitive occupational performance across the lifespan and performance contexts.  Psychosocial subcomponents include psychological skills (values, interests, self-concept), social skills (role performance, social conduct, interpersonal skills, and self-expression), and self-management abilities (coping skills, time management, and self-control). Cognitive subcomponents (level of arousal, orientation, attention span, memory, sequencing, categorization, reasoning, executive functioning, problem solving, learning, and generalization).

OT 624: Fundamentals of OT Practice
The emphasis of this course is the development of professional level skills in the areas of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in regard to occupational therapy practice. This course includes skills such as interviewing, group interaction, documentation to ensure accountability, critical reading of research and scholarly papers, and public speaking. Additionally, students learn the history and philosophical base of occupational therapy practice as well as ethical aspects of practice.

OT 631: OT Theory and Clinical Reasoning
This course presents development and application of theoretical constructs, practice models, and frames of reference that relate to the profession of occupational therapy. Students will examine historical antecedents and socio-political contexts that led to the development of the profession. In addition, students will identify, examine, and apply various types of clinical reasoning pertinent to critical thinking and to the occupational therapy process. 

OT 633: Physical Disabilities/Ortho
Providing a focus in the areas of physical disabilities and orthopedics, this course continues the exploration of the etiology, clinical course, management, and prognosis of congenital and developmental disabilities, acute and chronic disease processes, and traumatic injuries.  Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of the potential effects of such conditions on anatomical structures, physiological processes and the functional performance of individuals throughout the lifespan. Students gain skills in evaluation and treatment regarding environmental adjustments, splints, orthotics, assistive technology, adapted equipment, physical agent modalities,

OT 637: Occupational Interventions/Evidence Based Practice
This course emphasizes the study of intervention principles, strategies, and theoretical bases in relation to the practice of occupational therapy throughout the lifespan.  Emphasis is placed on clinical reasoning, evidence-based service provision, best practices, and quality assurance. Students examine factors affecting occupation and occupational performance such as environmental demands, available resources, media, modalities, and collaboration with all involved individuals in relation to intervention strategies.

OT 641: Occupational Therapy Research
This course is designed to provide an introduction to the philosophical underpinnings of inquiry, the importance of research, the traditions of research, and essential components of research.  Focus will be placed on learning different aspects of quantitative and qualitative research designs as well as the ethical concerns of research. 

OT 643: Occupational Considerations of Activities of Daily Living
Focusing on purposeful and meaningful activities throughout the lifespan, this course addresses enhancement of occupational engagement using ADL and IADL in relation to areas of occupation, performance skills & patterns, contexts, activity demands, and client factors.

OT 651: Professional Trends/Emerging Practice
Student will explore and integrate factors contributing to trends within the practice of occupational therapy while formulating opportunities for the expanding the practice of occupational therapy into emerging areas of practice.

OT 652: Applied Neuroscience
Providing a focus in the area of neuroscience, this course explores the structural and functional concepts of the human nervous system including etiology, clinical course, management, prognosis of congenital and developmental disabilities, acute and chronic disease processes, and traumatic injuries.  Emphasis is placed on developing an understanding of the potential effects of such conditions on anatomical structures, physiological processes, and the occupations of individuals across the lifespan.

OT 657: Specialized Evaluation
Focusing on the OT evaluation process, this course uses application of tests and measurement principles. During the OT process, the emphasis for this course is placed on gathering initial evaluative data, determining and documenting the need for skilled therapy services, individualized treatment planning, reeavaluation, and discharge planning while selecting appropriate and EBP standardized and nonstandardized basic and specialized OT assessment tools. The professional relationship with occupational therapy assistants in the evaluation process will also be addressed.

OT 662: Professional Issues
This course provides opportunities to integrate the practice of occupational therapy with current political, social, economic, professional, and cultural factors at play in practice environments.  Students will analyze the health care and wellness systems of the U.S. and the diversity of players impacting occupational therapy practice. While gaining insight into the standards set by professional, political, and economic players, students will develop an understanding of the need to assume individual responsibility for planning their professional development in order to maintain a level of practice consistent with current standards and expectations.

OT 663: Occupation Centered Practice
Focusing on the core belief of occupational science, this course explores the historical concept, value, and meaning of occupation while building upon underlying theoretical constructs. Elements of analyzing tasks and activities central to individual wellness and function will also be examined.

OT 671: OT Leadership
The focus of this course is to develop executive leadership, management skills, and a working understanding of the following topics: organizational mission and vision, strategic planning, personnel management, reimbursement systems, accrediting bodies, basic budgeting concepts, internal and external marketing of OT services and interdisciplinary cooperation.  These skills are applied to the delivery of occupational therapy services in a variety of service models including medical, community, and educational systems. Emphasis is placed on understanding social needs of the community in the context of program development and collaborating with other health care professional for the effective delivery of services.

OT 683: Advanced OT Research
In this course, students conduct and disseminate scholarly work of the profession including examining, developing, refining, and evaluating the profession’s body of knowledge, theoretical base, and philosophical foundations. Specific tasks involve designing and directing the completion of various studies, including data analysis, interpretation, and dissemination of results; collaborating with others to facilitate studies of concern to the profession; and mentoring novice researchers.

OT 690: Special Topics
This course provides opportunities for concentrated study in an emerging, innovative, or specialized area of the occupational therapy profession. This particular syllabus offers a concentrated study of leadership through in depth study of leadership theories, exploration of various leadership qualities, and critical analysis of leadership literature.

OT 695: Professional Practicum Seminar A & B
This practicum course is designed to provide an introduction to fieldwork and application of occupation and occupational performance.  Focus will be placed on providing fieldwork opportunities to students to demonstrate clinical skills while analyzing fieldwork matters and integrating fieldwork experience with occupational therapy process and practice issues.  This course will include two 40 clock hour Level I fieldwork experiences.

OT 696: Professional Fieldwork I
In this Level II fieldwork experience of at least 12 weeks, students synthesize knowledge gained throughout their educational experiences including liberal arts courses (University Core Curriculum) as well as the professional sequence of occupational therapy coursework by delivering occupational therapy services to persons having various levels of occupational performance. For service delivery, students use clinical reasoning, self-reflection, and creativity in their utilization of various occupational therapy theoretical approaches throughout the occupational therapy process. By the end of this internship, the student must function as an entry level occupational therapist. Fieldwork I must vary from Fieldwork II to reflect a difference in (a) in ages across the lifespan of persons requiring occupational therapy services, (b) the setting with regard to chronicity (long term versus short term), and (c) facility type (institutional versus community based).

OT 697: Professional Fieldwork II
In this Level II fieldwork experience of at least 12 weeks, students synthesize knowledge gained throughout their educational experiences including liberal arts courses (University Core Curriculum) as well as the professional sequence of occupational therapy coursework by delivering occupational therapy services to persons having various levels of occupational performance. For service delivery, students use clinical reasoning, self-reflection, and creativity in their utilization of various occupational therapy theoretical approaches throughout the occupational therapy process. By the end of this internship, the student must function as an entry level occupational therapist. Fieldwork I must vary from Fieldwork II to reflect a difference in (a) in ages across the lifespan of persons requiring occupational therapy services, (b) the setting with regard to chronicity (long term versus short term), and (c) facility type (institutional versus community based).

OT 699: Occupational Therapy Synthesis
This course is designed to provide students opportunities to synthesize their preparation for advanced practice across three roles:  a central role of specialization (selected by the graduate student) supported by two required roles, educator and researcher. Resulting in a product of an innovative scholarly project to meet community needs, this course also emphasizes professional reflection on the process aspect.


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  • 8600 University Blvd.
  • Evansville, IN 47712
  • 812-464-8600
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