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Students at English PicnicEnglish (prefix ENG)

Following certain course descriptions are the designations: F, Sp, Su. These indicate the semesters fall, spring, summer in which the course is normally offered and are intended as an aid to students planning their programs of study.


ENG 100 Introduction to Rhetoric and Composition (3) A portfolio-based, preparatory course in reading, writing, reflection, and discussion, emphasizing rhetorical analysis and strategies for focusing, developing, and organizing writing. Special attention also is given to strategies for revising and editing writing. Course credits will apply as electives toward graduation. Prereq: GENS 098 or appropriate placement, based on such factors as the RCPE score, high school GPA, high school class rank, and DRP. Basic keyboarding skills required. A "C" is the minimum grade for a ENG 100 student to progress to ENG 101. F, Sp, Su

ENG 101 Rhetoric and Composition I: Literacy and the Self (3) A course in the critical arts of reading, writing, reflection, and discussion with an introduction to rhetoric and informal logic. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal A 1: Composition/Speech. Prereq: ENG 100 or appropriate placement based on SAT Critical Reading and Writing Scores (or ACT equivalents), high school rank percentile, and English Department placement essay. Basic keyboarding skills required. F. Sp. Su

ENG 103 Fundamentals of Creative Writing (1) This course, designed specifically for incoming freshmen with creative writing scholarships, teaches the fundamentals of poetry and fiction writing. Students will read and write fiction and poetry. F

ENG 105 Introduction to Literature: Topics (3) An introduction to literature emphasizing the ability to read critically. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal B2: The Arts. Topics vary. No prereq. F, Sp, Su

ENG 201 Rhetoric and Composition II: Literacy and the World (3)A second course in the critical arts of reading, writing, reflection, and discussion emphasizing the responsibilities of written inguiry and structured reasoning. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal A1: Composition/Speech. Prereq: Grade of C or higher in ENG 101 or approved transfer equivalent. F, Sp, Su

ENG 205 Introduction to English Studies and Ways of Reading (3) ENG 205 introduces students to the major literary genres (lyric poetry, drama, and prose fiction), to significant theoretical orientations (such as formalism, reader-response, Marxism, and feminism) that establish particular ways of reading any text, and to the range of disciplines included within the study of English (including linguistics, rhetoric, writing, and the teaching of English). This course is intended to help students become more critical and informed readers, more comfortable with the terminology used across the broad spectrum of English courses, and more able to marshal technical information and apply theoretical concepts in their literary interpretations. Prereq: ENG 201 or equivalent. F, Sp

ENG 210 Technical Writing (3) The fundamentals of technical communication with emphasis on clear, precise, and orderly exposition. Prereq: ENG 101. F, Sp

ENG 222 Concepts of Good and Evil in Literature (3) A study of literary works from different countries and eras that reflect on the causes, nature, and consequences of evil. Special focus on development of ethical principles and decision-making. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal B1: Ethics. Prereq: ENG 101. (See more information for Spring 2010...)

ENG 231 African American Literature (3) A course which examines the African American literary tradition, covering representative works from the African pre-colonial and modern periods, nineteenth century American, the Harlem Renaissance to the present. Included are works by African and African American authors from the oral and written traditions of poetry, prose, and drama.

ENG 255 Introduction to British Literary History (3) ENG 255 examines the historical development of British literature, from the Anglo-Saxon invasions that catalyzed the birth of a British national identity and brought Beowulf into the literature of England, through the contentious development of this national identity into a global power, to Britain’s 20th century post-colonial status. By concentrating on representative or “canonical” works as well as those conventionally under-represented, the course will provide students with the background necessary to understand British literary works in their social, political, and cultural contexts. Prerequisite: English 101 or equivalent. Meets Core Curriculum Goal B2: The Arts. F, Sp

ENG 265 Introduction to American Literary History (3) ENG 265 provides an overview of the main currents in the development of American literature, from its beginnings in pre-colonial times, through its reliance on and then struggle against British and European themes and forms, to its 20th-century development into the many voices of an uneasily multi-ethnic world power. By historically situating representative works from within the canon as well as from voices traditionally excluded or under-represented, the course will provide students with the background necessary to understand literature as the product of and often as challenging this background. Prereq: English 101 or equivalent. Meets Core Curriculum Goal B2: The Arts. F, Sp

ENG 285 Introduction to Film (3) An introductory examination of motion pictures as an art form. Students attend a series of selected films and discuss and evaluate them with respect to theme and technique. Critical principles are examined, and basic dramatic, literary, and photographic principles of cinema are investigated. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal B2: The Arts. No prereq. F, Sp

ENG 286 Classical Mythology (3) A study of the mythologies of the Near Eastern, Cretan, Greek, Roman, and Northern European civilizations. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal B2: The Arts. Prereq. ENG 201. F

ENG 288 Women in Literature Through the 18th Century (3) A study of representations of women in literature written by men and women. For the most part this course falls into these periods: Hebrew, Classical Greek, Roman, Medieval, Renaissance, Seventeenth, and Eighteenth Centuries. The course provides historical background for studying contemporary women’s literature, theory, and issues. No prereq.

ENG 299 Special Topics of Literature (3) Selected works grouped together because they all deal with the same type (e.g., “Science Fiction,” “Satire”) author(s) (“Hemingway and Fitzgerald,” “Virginia Woolf”), or concept (“Alienation in Literature,” “Psychology and Literature”). Each time this course is offered the particular topic is announced in the class schedule. A student may take this course only once for credit as part of the English requirements, but a student may take the course more than once for elective hours toward University requirements. No prereq.

ENG 301 Advanced Composition (3) An advanced composition course with a flexible format emphasizes the analysis of various rhetorical situations and the cultivation of prose styles appropriate to these situations. Prereq: ENG 201 or consent of instructor. F, Sp, Su

ENG 302 Creative Writing (3) Inquiry into the creative process. Students will write poems, short fiction, and dramatic scenes with critical analysis and discussion by the instructor and class. Meets the University Core Curriculum Goal B2: The Arts. Prereq: ENG 201 or consent of instructor. F, Sp

ENG 303 Poetry Workshop (3) An intense study of poetry, in which students examine poems of others and address in their own poems, issues of character, personality, image, nuance, tone, setting, and concision. Prereq: ENG 302. F

ENG 304 Fiction Workshop (3) An intense study of fiction in which students examine fiction of others and write fiction of their own. Prereq: ENG 302. Sp

ENG 305 Creative Non-Fiction Workshop (3) A course in which students will hone critical skills and polish their prose in the literary essay. Prereq: ENG 302. F

ENG 307 Screenwriting Workshop (3) An intense study of screenwriting in which students examine screenplays of others and write a full length screenplay of their own. Prereq: ENG 302. Sp

ENG 310 Writing in the Secondary Schools (3) A course for prospective secondary school teachers on issues related to teaching writing in grades 5-12, including writing as a process, assigning and evaluating student writing, portfolio assessment, and research as writing to learn. Students also will practice writing in a variety of modes. Required for Teacher Certification in English. Prereq: ENG 301 or consent of instructor. F

ENG 311 Editing for Writers (This course deleted September 17, 2010)

ENG 313 Introduction to Linguistics (3) An introduction to the discipline of linguistics, with particular attention to the following fields: historical linguistics, comparative linguistics, descriptive linguistics, semantics, applied linguistics (with special reference to education), sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, and assorted grammatical studies. Prereq: ENG 201 or permission of instructor. Sp

ENG 314 Survey of English Grammars (3) Survey of the tradition of English grammatical study, including scholarly and pedagogical grammars, from the eighteenth century to the present. Prereq: ENG 201 or consent of instructor. Sp

ENG 316 Critical and Investigative Writing (3) A course aimed at developing critical thinking and investigative skill–the latter involving greater sophistication not only in secondary research but also in primary research (e.g., questionnaires, interviews, etc.) These skills are applicable whether the writing is for government agencies, non-profit organizations, research foundations, business, industry, or education. No prereq. F

ENG 319 Fundamentals of Grant Writing (3)  This course studies the grant writing process specifically including learning the basics of philanthropy from grant seeker and donor perspectives and understanding the overall grant seeking and funding process (the rhetoric of proposal guidelines, required submission components, and follow up procedures).  Through designing and writing an individual grant proposal, as well as a narrowly focused, collaborative mock grant proposal, students will develop a thorough grounding in how to submit a grant proposal to a private foundation, corporation, or government institution. Prereq: ENG 201.

ENG 322 The Short Story (3) A chronological investigation of the development of the short story, emphasizing the short story in English but considering European, Asian, and Latin American traditions as well. Prereq: ENG 201 and sophomore standing.

ENG 330 Ethnic Literature in America (3) A survey of significant minority contributions to literature, particularly Black-American, but including Native-American, Asian-American, and Mexican-American. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal B2: The Arts and C2: Individual Development/Social Behavior. Prereq: 62 semester hours of credit or consent of instructor. Sp

ENG 335 Playwriting (3) (Course number change to ENG 361.)

ENG 336 Playwriting II (3) (Is no longer being offered.)

ENG 355 Modernist Irish Literature (3) (This course deleted September 17, 2010)

ENG 361 Playwriting (3) Students will participate in an intense student of dramaturgy and will write dramas of their own. Cross-listed with THTR 361. Prereq: ENG 302 or THTR 102 or consent of instructor.

ENG 371 Non-Western World Literature (3) Readings in the literature and literary theory of the non-Western World. This course engages in detailed analysis of key texts written in English or English translation. Readings may be selected from the literatures of Asia, Africa, the Caribbean, and the Middle East. Prerequisites: ENG 201 and Sophomore/Junior standing. Cross-listed with INST 371.

ENG 372 Western World Literature (3) Readings in the literature and literary theory of the Western World, outside of Great Britain and the United States. This course engages in detailed analysis of key texts in English or English translation. Readings may be selected from the literatures of the European Continent and the Western Hemisphere. Prerequisites: ENG201 and Sophomore/Junior standing. Cross-listed with INST 372.

ENG 375 Modern Canadian Literature (3) A study of major trends and authors in modern Canadian prose fiction from about 1930 to the present, with some consideration of cultural backgrounds. Prereq: ENG 201 and junior standing

ENG 381 Medieval World Literature (3) An introduction to Medieval World Literature in translation, including works from Europe, the Middle East and Asia from the 6th C CE to 1400 CE. Students will read major works by authors such as Boethius, Dante, Christine de Pizan, Petrarch, Abelard and Heloise, Chretien de Troyes, Farid Ud-Din Attar, Kenko, Sei Shonagon and Ou-Yang Hsui, as well as anonymous Irish and Anglo-Saxon texts. Prereq: ENG 201 and sophomore standing.

ENG 382 Literature of the Bible (3)Literary study of selected writings from the Hebrew Bible, the Apocrypha, and the New Testament, in English translation. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal B2: The Arts. Prereq: sophomore standing or consent of instructor.

ENG 383 Literature of the Bible II (3) (This course is deleted.)

ENG 386 World Mythology (3) An examination of the major cultural mythologies from around the world for cross-cultural comparisons and contrasts. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal C.5: Global Communities. Prereq: ENG 201 and sophomore standing. Sp

ENG 387 Women’s Literature and Gender Issues: 19th- and 20th-Century Theory and Praxis (3) A study of significant 19th- and 20th-century works of literature and literary theory by or about women, with special emphasis on the implications of gender for art and culture. Prereq: ENG 201 or consent of instructor.

ENG 389 World Literature in Translation (3) Readings in world literature in translation, in cultural context. Selections and themes may vary per offering. May be taken twice for credit as topic varies. Cross-listed with INST 389. Prereq: ENG 201 and sophomore standing.

ENG 399 Special Topics in Creative Writing Techniques(3) This course is a revolving-content course on the artful use of specific techniques in creative writing through reading, writing, and workshop.  Students should have workshop (303, 304, or 305) experience in the genre being studied, or permission of the instructor.  This course is repeatable for up to 9 credit hours in the Creative Writing emphasis.  Prereq:  ENG 302.

ENG 402 Advanced Creative Writing (3) An advanced course designed for students committed to writing professional poetry, or fiction. Students will be admitted by consent of the instructor and will contract with the instructor to concentrate in one of the above areas. Prereq: ENG 302 and 303 or 304, or consent of instructor. F, Sp

ENG 411 Writing in the Digital Age (3) A course in the kinds of writing made possible by computer-based composing with attention to the impact of technology and computers upon the writer’s process and product. The course will cover word processing, document design, desktop publishing, hypertext, e-mail, Internet information access, and multimedia presentation. Prereq: ENG 301.

ENG 412 Writing for the Professions (3) Study of practical ways to write the specialized documentation needed for today’s industry, science, research, and technical management. Prereq: ENG 301.

ENG 413 Theory in Rhetoric and Writing (3) A course that examines the historical development of rhetoric and writing studies paying special attention to current theory and pedagogy. Course includes reading in major movements from pre-process to post-process; modes of inquiry such as theoretical, historical, and empirical; and areas of special importance to today's teachers and scholars, including feminist rhetoric, culture studies, and social justice. Counts toward the directed elective requirement within the English teaching major and fulfills the directed elective theory requirement within the Rhetoric and Writing Emphasis. Prereq: ENG 201 and junior standing.

ENG 414 Intercultural Technical Writing (3) Intercultural Technical Writing will provide students with the ability to discern and conceptualize the codes, conventions, and discourse structures of differing cultures, thus enabling students to both localize and internationalize technical and professional documents. This course emphasizes that recognizing and analyzing cultural diversity is essential for successful communication within the scientific, technical, and business fields. Prereq: ENG 201 and Junior Standing.

ENG 415 History of Rhetoric (3) An understanding and comparison of various movements in the history of rhetoric, with particular emphasis on the relationship between rhetorical strategy and one’s image of human beings and on historical events which influenced rhetoric. The course aims to increase the scope of students’ understanding of rhetoric and help them apply this knowledge to their own communication and to their evaluation of the communications of others. Cross-listed with philosophy. Prereq: ENG 201 and junior standing. F

ENG 416 Contemporary Issues in Rhetoric (3) An intensive exploration of the 20th century’s re-valuing of rhetoric as an interdisciplinary theory of language and meaning. This course complements ENG 415 (The History of Rhetoric). Prereq: ENG 205 and junior standing.

ENG 417 History of the English Language (3) A chronological study of the recorded history of the English language from the ninth century to the present. Detailed study of major changes in phonology, lexicon (morphology and semantics), and syntax. Attention to the notion and practice of Standard English and to the development and current state of dialects in the USA. Prereq: ENG 201 and junior standing. F

ENG 419 Advanced Grant Writing (3)  This course applies the fundamentals and theory of grant writing to a client-based project with non-profit or not-for-profit local organizations in a service-learning environment.  Students will work with the client to locate sources of funding, prepare the grant proposal, and submit the grant application to the appropriate agency.  Classroom instruction will include rhetorical analysis of the grant-writing situation broadly allowing them to apply principles of effective grant writing to a specific client and grant situation.  English 419 also emphasizes the effective management of collaborative writing and client-based projects.  This course is repeatable up to 6 hours for the Rhetoric and Writing emphasis.  Prereq: ENG 319 or permission of instructor.

ENG 424 Chaucer (3) A study of the major works of Geoffrey Chaucer, particularly The Canterbury Tales, with attention to the language and times of Chaucer. Includes lecture and discussion. Prereq: 62 semester hours of credit or consent of instructor.

ENG 425 Milton: Prose and Poetry (3) John Milton’s prose and poetry constitute essential parts of the English tradition in literature, politics, and religion. This course focuses on Milton’s prose writings—e.g., Areopagitica and The Tenure of Kings and Magistrates—which have profoundly influenced both the English and American politics and on his lyric, epic, and dramatic poems including close study of Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained. Prereq: ENG 201, junior standing or permission of instructor.

ENG 426 The Literature of the Renaissance (3) Non-Shakespearean drama, poetry, and prose of the Renaissance. Emphasis on major figures such as Spenser, Donne, and Milton. Prereq: either ENG 255 and ENG 301 or consent of instructor.

ENG 427 Neo-Classical and Eighteenth-Century Literature (3) From Dryden to the pre-Romantics. Emphasizes poetry and changing social thought in England and America, with continental backgrounds. Prereq: ENG 201 and junior standing.

ENG 431 Nineteenth-Century Literature (3) The writing of the English Romantics and Victorians and of American writers of the period, studied against the background of nineteenth-century continental writers. Prereq: ENG 201 and junior standing.

ENG 432 Twentieth-Century Poetry (3) A study of representative twentieth-century poets. Prereq: ENG 201 and junior standing.

ENG 433 History of Western Drama I (3) Survey of representative plays from classic through the Renaissance as a basis for theatrical production and dramatic criticism. Cross-listed as THTR 473. Prereq: ENG 201 and junior standing. F

ENG 434 History of Western Drama II (3) Survey of representative plays from the Restoration to the modern periods as a basis for theatrical production and dramatic criticism. Cross-listed as THTR 474. Prereq: ENG 201 and junior standing. Sp

ENG 435 The Novel to the Twentieth Century (3)A study of prose fiction to 1900 including the origins of the novel in the seventeenth century, the Enlightenment and Romantic Era, and the great Victorian, American, European, and Russian writers of the nineteenth century in English or in English translation. Prereq: ENG 201 and junior standing.

ENG 436 The Novel of the Twentieth Century (3)A study of prose fiction after 1900, including the great Modernist writers of England and Europe along with great post-Modernist practitioners from throughout the world including Latin America, the Middle East, and Australia in English or in English translation. Prereq: ENG 201 and junior standing.

ENG 437 Contemporary Fiction (3)A study of prose fiction of the recent past by practitioners from throughout the world either in English or in English translation. Prereq: ENG201 and junior standing.

ENG 438 Twentieth-Century Southern Literature (3) (Course to be deleted)

ENG 442 Literature of the Middle Ages (3) This course covers a broad range of medieval literary forms including drama, romance, lyrics and ballads, letters, treatises, and devotional literatures of the Middle Ages. Prereq: ENG 201 and junior standing

ENG 444 Literature in the Secondary Schools (3) A course on issues related to the teaching of literature in grades 5 to 12, including censorship, literary theory, adolescent literature, multicultural literature, the ethics of reading, and the connections between reading and the other language arts: writing, speaking, and listening. Prereq: ENG 301.

ENG 448 Literary Criticism and Theory (3) A study of literary criticism and aesthetic theory. Consists of a survey of literary theories, and an introduction to current critical approaches to literature. Prereq: ENG 201 and junior standing. Sp

ENG 449 Major Author (3) An intensive study of the works of a major author in fiction, poetry, drama or non fiction. Course may be repeated for credit as long as the student has not previously studied the author in an ENG 449. Prereq: junior standing. Sp

ENG 451 Plays of Shakespeare (3) An intensive study of selected histories and tragedies written by William Shakespeare. Prereq: ENG 201 and junior standing, or permission of instructor. F 

ENG 453 Shakespeare's Comedies and Romances (3) An intensive study of selected comedies and romances by William Shakespeare. Prereq: ENG 201 and junior standing, or permission of instructor. 

ENG 459 Special Studies in English (1-6) English studies in conjunction with special activities and events, such as seminars, conferences, field work, travel projects, and research. Semester hours of credit awarded for each offering will be determined by the instructor and the department chairperson. Repeatable for up to three hours with change of topics. Prereq: consent of instructor.

ENG 467 The Contemporary American Novel (3) An exploration of the literary trends and movements in America from ca. 1960 to 2005 and with the leading figures who have shaped the American literary tradition of this period.  The course will consider literary and cultural changes, with particular attention to unique features of the contemporary American novel.

ENG 473 History of Western Drama I (3) Survey of representative plays from the Classics through the English Renaissance as a basis for theatrical production and dramatic criticism. Cross-listed as THTR 473. Prereq: ENG 201 and junior standing, or consent of instructor.

ENG 474 History of Western Drama II (3) Survey of representative plays from the French Renaissance to the modern period as a basis for theatrical production and dramatic criticism. Cross-listed as THTR 474. Prereq: ENG 201 and junior standing, or consent of instructor.

ENG 480 Independent Study (3) Individualized study under the -direction of a faculty member, leading to the production of a substantial written product. May be used to -meet a requirement for the English major or minor with prior approval of the department chairperson. A maximum of six credit hours may be earned. Prereq: ENG 205 and junior standing.

ENG 490 Practicum: Tutoring and Individualized Instruction in English (3) A course that enables a student to gain practical experience in teaching English on a one-to-one basis while staffing the University’s Writing Workshop. Tuition waiver possible. Hours do not apply to University Core Curriculum or the English major. Students attend a weekly seminar of approximately one and one-half hours and tutor in the workshop. Prereq: consent of instructor. F, Sp

ENG 491 The Writer at Work (3) An advanced seminar for students in the Writing Emphasis, the Writing Concentration, or the Creative Writing Concentration, involving all aspects of preparing a manuscript through actual publication. Students will complete a project demonstrating such professional competence. Prereq: senior standing and consent of instructor. F, Sp.

ENG 498 Internship in English (3) A course granting credit for work experiences related complementing the English major. The course provides for a minimum of 150 hours of supervised professional work, two written evaluations by the supervisor, an on-site visit by a University representative, maintenance of a log or portfolio, and periodic interviews with a department faculty member. Open to juniors or seniors. Grades assigned as Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory only. Prereq: ENG 301 and consent of instructor. F, Sp, Su

ENG 499 Seminar in Literature and Language (3) An advanced topics course for majors, minors, and other qualified students. A maximum of six credit hours may be earned. Prereq: 62 semester hours of credit and consent of instructor.

ENG 515 History of Rhetoric (3) An understanding and comparison of various movements in the history of rhetoric, with particular emphasis on the relationship between rhetorical strategy and one's image of man and on historical events which influenced rhetoric. The course aims to increase the scope of students' understanding of rhetoric and help them apply this knowledge to their own writing and their evaluation of the writing of others. 

ENG 516 Contemporary Issues in Rhetoric (3) An intensive exploration of the 20th century's re-valuing of rhetoric as an interdisciplinary theory of language and meaning. No prereq.

ENG 517 History of the English Language (3) A chronological study of the recorded history of the English language from the ninth century to the present. Detailed study of major changes in phonology, lexicon (morphology and semantics), and syntax. Attention to the notion and practice of standard English and to the development and current state of dialects in the U.S.A. Format will include lecture and discussion. No prerequisite.

ENG 524 Chaucer (3) A study of the major works of Geoffrey Chaucer, particularly The Canterbury Tales and Troilus and Criseyde, with attention to the language and times of Chaucer. Format will include lecture and discussion. 

ENG 527 Neo-Classical and Eighteenth-Century Literature (3) From Dryden to the pre-Romantics. Emphasizes poetry and changing social thought in England and America, with continental backgrounds.

ENG 532 Twentieth Century Poetry (3) A study of representative twentieth-century poets.

ENG 535 The Novel to the Twentieth Century (3) A study of prose fiction to 1900 including the origins of the novel in the seventeenth century, the Enlightenment and Romantic Era, and the great Victorian, American, European, and Russian writers of the nineteenth century in English or in English translation.

ENG 536 The Novel of the Twentieth Century (3) A study of prose fiction after 1900, including the great Modernist writers of England and Europe along with great post-Modernist practitioners from throughout the world including Latin America, the Middle East, and Australia in English or in English translation.

ENG 537 Contemporary Fiction (3) A study of prose fiction of the recent past by practitioners from throughout the world either in English or in English translation.

ENG 538 Twentieth Century Southern Literature (3) A study of the literature produced by American southern writers from ca. 1920 to the present. 

ENG 542 Literature of the Middle Ages (3) This course covers a broad range of medieval literary forms including lyrics, romance, ballads, drama, letters, treatises, and devotional literatures of the Middle Ages.

ENG 544 Literature in the Secondary Schools (3) A course designed for graduate students who are seeking additional study on the issues related to the teaching of literature in grades 5-12, including censorship, literary literature, multi-cultural literature, the ethics of reading, and the connections between reading and the other language arts: writing, speaking, and listening.

ENG 548 Literary Criticism and Theory (3) A study of literary criticism and theory, both classic texts and contemporary trends. Readings from Plato to poststructuralism. Examination of traditional approaches such as psychological, Marxist, formal, as well as such diverse contemporary approaches as feminist criticism, structuralism, and reader-response criticism. 

ENG 549 Major Author (3) An intensive study of the works of a major author in fiction, poetry, drama, or non fiction.  Course may be repeated for credit as long as the student has not previously studied the author in an ENG 549. No prereq.

ENG 551 Shakespeare: Histories/Tragedies (3) An intensive study of selected histories and tragedies by William Shakespeare.

ENG 553 Shakespeare: Comedies/Romances (3) An intensive study of selected comedies and romances by William Shakespeare.

ENG 590 Writing Center Practice and Administration (4) A course that focuses on connections between writing center theory and writing center practice, especially regarding how writing centers approach clients’ multiple literacies, establish boundaries for client/consultant collaboration, and define writing as a process. Students will consider theories of how writing centers can be organized and administered, including approaches to tutor training and the use of online writing labs. In addition to a total of three-hour weekly meetings, students work two hours per week in the Writer’s Room.

ENG 599 Seminar in Literature and Language (3) An advanced topics course, with subject matter varying from semester to semester. Not to be taken more than once by master's degree candidates without prior permission of the English Department.

ENG 601 Introduction to the Professional Study of English (3) An introduction to English as a professional discipline beginning with a history of English studies within American institutions of learning. Provides a context for future activities in teaching and scholarship by providing direct experience not only with the range of activities professionals engage in, but also with the bibliographic methodologies they pursue. 

ENG 602 Writing Portfolios (3) A composition course designed for area teachers emphasizing issues related to the teaching of writing in the secondary schools.

ENG 613 Theory in Rhetoric and Writing (3) A study of the relationship between theory and practice in the field of composition pedagogy. This curse introduces seminal movements in the field of rhetoric and composition, from pre-process to post-process; considers new directions in composition, such as digital literacy; and explores ethical issues in literacy education, such as second-language writing instruction and intercultural rhetoric. The course will provide an opportunity for students to reflectively develop their own composition pedagogy while engaging in theory building.

ENG 614 River Bend Writing Project Invitational Summer Institute (3) A five-week invitational summer institute for teachers K-16 administered by the River Bend National Writing Project site at USI. Utilizes the National Writing Project model of teaching demonstrations, readings in and discussions of contemporary composition theory and pedagogy, and guided inquiry projects for writing and research. Prereq: consent of instructor.