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Dr. Todd Schroer
Email: tschroer
812/464-1723

Picture of male student studying Following certain course descriptions are the designations: F, Sp, Su. These indicate the semesters fall, spring, summer in which the course is normally offered and are intended as an aid to students planning their programs of study.

CRIM 141 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3) (Last Date Offered:  Spring 2009)
(Student may substitute CRIM244, CRIM234, or POLS208 for CRIM141.)

CRIM 200 Special Topics in Criminal Justice (3) This course allows for the study of selected topics of current interest and importance in criminal justice. These topics will vary in accordance with the interests of students and faculty. Students may repeat the course without limit, as the topic changes. Prereq: two of the following CJS courses: CRIM 234, CRIM 244, POLS 208, SOC 225.

CRIM 234 Introduction to Corrections (3)  This course will examine the historical, philosophical, and theoretical foundations of correction systems and organizations.  Topics include but are not limited to sentencing options, treatment of prisoners, prisoner subcultures, prison life, rehabilitative programming for prisoners, prisoner health care, prisoners' rights, community-based corrections, prisoner release and re-entry, and the nature of working in and managing prisons.  Prereq: ENG101 and CMST101
or CMST107.

CRIM 244 Police & Society (3) This course explores how the various law enforcement agencies interact with society.  The main topics include the history of law enforcement in the U.S. and other countries, and current issues and controversies in policing.   No Prereq: ENG101 and CMST101 or CMST107.

CRIM 301 Criminal Justice Administration (3) Analysis of the public institutions which determines policy and practice in the administration of the criminal justice system. This will include the legislature, the police, the courts, and correctional systems. Prereq: two of the following CJS courses: CRIM 234, CRIM 244, POLS 208, SOC 225. Sp

CRIM 302 Criminal Law (3) History and development of criminal law as a system of social control; the relationship among criminal laws; and the workings of courts and correctional systems. Prereq: two of the following CJS courses: CRIM 234, CRIM 244, POLS 208, SOC 225. F

CRIM 311 Convict Criminology (3)  This course introduces the "Convict Criminology Perspective" as a means to educate students, prisoners and the general public.  Convict Criminology is a new way of thinking about crime and corrections.  Convict criminology is a developing field in critical criminology that "...consists primarily of essays and empirical research conducted and written by convicts or ex-convicts, on their way to completing or already in possession of a Ph.D., or by enlightened academics who critique existing literature, policies, and practices, thus contributing to a new perspective on criminology, criminal justice, corrections, and community corrections" (Ross and Richards, 2003, p.6).  Students will complete required readings, develop critical thinking and problem solving skills through interaction with the professor and other students in the classroom.  This course provides students with opportunities to discuss course topics and material both in class and through e-mail.  Prereq: two of the following CJS courses: CRIM 234, CRIM 244, POLS 208, SOC 225.

CRIM 312 Organized Crime (3) The purpose of this course is to highlight: 1) the social perception, nature, and extent of organized crime; 2) theoretical explanations of organized crime; 3) the business of organized crime; 4) measures being taken to combat organized crime in the U.S. and around the world; and 5) differing world perspectives on organized crime.  Prereq: two of the following CJS courses: CRIM 234, CRIM 244, POLS 208, SOC 225.

CRIM 331 Gender and Crime (3) The focus of this course is on women's experiences as victims of crime, perpetrators of crime, prisoners, and as employees and practitioners working with and within the criminal justice system.  It includes a discussion of the feminist criminological perspective as it applies to these aforementioned experiences.  Prereq: two of the following CJS courses: CRIM 234, CRIM 244, POLS 208, SOC 225.

CRIM 370 Seminar in Criminal Justice (3) An intensive, small-group discussion of recent, provocative books on topics of current interest to criminal justice professionals and criminologists. The seminar format will emphasize critical thinking and discussion. Students may take the course more than once as the reading list changes. Prereq: two of the following CJS courses: CRIM 234, CRIM 244, POLS 208, SOC 225.

CRIM 371 Criminological Theory (3)  This course is a survey of the historical and contemporary theoretical explanations that related to crime, offenders, victims, and the criminal justice system.  The major emphases of the course will be the evaluation, assessment and critical analysis of criminological theory in general and the use of such theories in criminal justice policies.  Prereq: SOC 225 and 6 hours Criminal Justice Studies.

CRIM 401 Probation and Parole (3) The processes of probation and parole in the United States in terms of its historical development, philosophy, and standards; attention is focused on the utilization of parole and probation as tools of social control with special emphasis on the implications of the philosophical impact of probation and parole on field practices. Prereq: two of the following CJS courses: CRIM 234, CRIM 244, POLS 208, SOC 225. F

CRIM 403 Violence Against Women (3) This course will provide an overview of violence directed toward women. Crimes such as intimate partner violence/battering, stalking, rape, human trafficking, sexual assault, and sexual harassment will be analyzed within a broader social context. Prereq: Junior level standing.

CRIM 411 Criminal Enforcement Strategies: Evidentiary Problems (3)  This course is an examination of the common law and federal rules of evidence.  Topics include but are not limited to the law of searches and seizures, the exclusionary rule, confessions, types of evidence, chain of custody, examination of witnesses, hearsay, and testimony.  Prereq: two of the following CJS courses: CRIM 234, CRIM 244, POLS 208, SOC 225.

CRIM 412 Criminal Enforcement Strategies: Discretion (3)  This course is an in-depth examination of police discretion and the application of coercive power.  It includes analyses of the exercise and impact of police discretion on society and the impact that police discretion has on individual police officers, police departments, and societal support for law enforcement.  Prereq: two of the following CJS courses: CRIM 234, CRIM 244, POLS 208, SOC 225.

CRIM 475 Analyzing Criminal Justice Issues with GIS(3)  The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the use and application of geographic information systems in crime analysis.  Students will be introduced to 1) the underlying theory of GIS application, 2) a conceptual understanding of how to use GIS in crime analysis, 3 )a variety of analytical methodological designs that can be used with GIS software, and 4) how to apply a GIS supported design to answer a research question of their choosing.  Prereq: SOC 391 and SOC 392, or POLS 331 and POLS332; Senior Status.

489 Independent Study in Criminal Justice (3) An extensive examination of the main criminal justice/criminology ideas on a specific topic. The major paper is a product of critical reading or advanced research. The course may be repeated for up to six credit hours. Prereq: nine hours sociology/criminal justice and consent of instructor.

CRIM 499 Internship in Criminal Justice (3) An opportunity for work experience in the area of criminal justice. For students interested in graduate school, the internship will involve field research. The course may be repeated for up to six credit hours with different placements. Prereq: nine hours sociology/criminal justice and consent of instructor.