Image of a studentCourse Descriptions

A. The Mind: Enhancement of Cognitive Development (12-13 hours) 

A1. Composition/Communication Studies (Speech) 9 hours

ENG 101 Rhetoric and Composition I: Critical Thinking (3) A course in the critical arts of reading. writing. reflection. and discussion. with an introduction to rhetoric and informal logic. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal A 1: Composition/Speech and A3 Critical Thinking. Prereq: C or higher in ENG 100 or appropriate placement based on SAT Critical Reading and Writing Scores (or ACT equivalents), high school rank percentile, and English Department placement essay. F. Sp. Su

ENG 201: Rhetoric and Composition II: Literacy and the World (3)A second course in the critical arts of reading, writing, reflection, and discussion emphasizing the responsibilities of written inguiry and structured reasoning. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal A1: Composition/Speech. Prereq: Grade of C or higher in ENG 101 or approved transfer equivalent. F, Sp, Su

CMST 101:  Introduction to Public Speaking (3)  Principles and practices of oral communications  with selected experiences in their use. No prereq. F, Sp, Su

CMST 107:  Introduction to Interpersonal Communication (3)   Increases understanding of oneself, the many roles one  plays in the communication process, and the interpersonal relationships of individuals in society. Course includes nonverbal communication, the role of language in structuring interpersonal situations, and the importance of dialogue in resolving interpersonal conflicts. No prereq. F, Sp, SuA2.

THTR 251:  Acting I (3) Study and practice in the fundamentals of the acting process. Class emphasizes physical and vocal work in conjunction with exercises geared toward the expansion of personal imaginative skills. Class work focuses on monologues and improvisational games. Open to all University students.

A2. Mathematics 3-4 hours

MATH 107: Fundamentals of Mathematics for Nurses (4) This course focuses on understanding the mathematics required for nursing. Topics include algebraic concepts and procedures (equations, ratios, proportions, percentage problems, formulas, logarithmic calculations), geometric concepts and procedures (systems of measurements and conversions, area, volume), problem-solving techniques (modeling, dosage calculations, flow-rate calculations, angle measurements) and an introduction to statistical methods and procedures (measures of central tendency, constructing and interpreting graphs, range, standard deviaiton and coefficient of variation, normal distributions). This online course is open only to persons with an Associate’s Degree in nursing who have completed at least one semester of intermediate algebra and who are seeking a BS or MS degree in nursing. This course satisfies the A2 category of the University Core Curriculum.

MATH 108: Survey of Mathematics (4)  A survey of contemporary topics in mathematics designed to introduce students to thinking processes developed in mathematics. Scientific calculators will be used. This course satisfies the A2 category of the University Core Curriculum.  Prereq: MATH 100 (grade of C or better) or satisfactory placement score. F, Sp, Su

MATH 111: College Algebra (4)  Topics to be emphasized include: Polynomials, rational algebraic expressions, graphs, inequalities, theory of equations and matrices. Special attention is focused on functions and the utilization of appropriate technology. This course satisfies the A2 category of the University Core Curriculum.  Prereq: MATH 100 (grade of C or better) or satisfactory placement score. F, Sp, Su

MATH 115: Pre-Calculus Mathematics (3)  Advanced topics in algebra plus selected topics in trigonometry, elementary functions (polynomials, rational, algebraic, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric) are studied with emphasis upon notation, properties, operations, and graphs of functions and their inverse. This course satisfies the A2 category of the University Core Curriculum.  Prereq: MATH 111 (grade of C or better) or satisfactory placement score. Students with minimal knowledge of trigonometry may enroll concurrently in MATH 112. F, Sp, Su

MATH 118: Comprehensive Pre-Calculus (3)  This course is designed for students planning to enroll in MATH 230, Calculus I. The study of functions (polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, algebraic, and trigonometric) forms the foundation for this course. This course will promote the development of algebraic and analytic skills as well as conceptual understanding. This course satisfies the A2 category of the University Core Curriculum.  Prereq: MATH 100 (grade of B or better) or MATH 111 or satisfactory placement score.  F, Sp 

MATH 122: Analytic Geometry (4)  Emphasis is placed on two and three dimensional coordinate geometry, lines, circles, conic sections, planes, Spheres, surfaces and basic properties of vectors. This course satisfies the A2 category of the University Core Curriculum.  Prereq: MATH 111 and MATH 112 (grade of C or better) or satisfactory placement score. 

MATH 202: Mathematical Concepts for Preschool through Primary Teachers (4)  This course extends the fundamental concepts studied in Math 106 and focuses on the topics for early childhood education students. These include concepts and processes in advanced counting, the four basic operations, angles and other geometrical concepts beyond shapes, elementary fractions, decimals, probability, and statistics.  The use of manipulatives and technology will support learning and teaching in these and other topics studied.  Enrollment is open only to students in early elementary programs.  Prereq: MATH 106 (grade of C or better). This course satisfies the A@ category of the Unviersity Core. Sp

MATH 203: Mathematics for Elementary Teachers II (4)  This course is the second in a two-course sequence designed to enhance the conceptual understanding and processes of the common content in elementary mathematics curricula. Topics include proportional reasoning, algebraic reasoning, geometry, measurement, data analysis, and probability. The use of manipulatives and technology will support learning and teaching of the topics studied. Enrollment is only open to students seeking a degree in elementary education or a related degree. This course satisfies the A2 category of the University Core Curriculum. Prereq: C or better in Math 103.

MATH 206: Mathematical Concepts for Elementary, Junior High, and Middle School Teachers (3)  This course contains fundamental concepts in mathematics selected for the elementary and/or junior high/middle school programs.  Included will be the examination of problem-solving processes and strategies, decimals, integers, real numbers and selected topics in algebra, statistics and probability. The use of manipulatives and technology will support learning and teaching in these and other topics. Enrollment is open only to students in elementary, special education, junior high, and middle school programs. Prereq: MATH 106 (grade of C or better). Sp

MATH 215: Survey of Calculus (3)  An introduction to calculus and its application in business, economics, and the social sciences. Not applicable to the mathematics major or minor. This course satisfies the A2 category of the University Core Curriculum.  Prereq: MATH 111, MATH 115 or consent of instructor. F, Sp, Su

MATH 230: Calculus I (4)  The theory of limits, differentiation, successive differentiation, the definite integral, indefinite integral, and applications of both the derivative and integral. This course satisfies the A2 category in the University Core Curriculum.  Prereq: MATH 115 (grade of C or better), MATH 118 (grade of C or better), satisfactory placement score, or consent of instructor. F, Sp, Su

B. The Self: Enhancement of Individual Development (8 hours)

B1. Ethics 3 hours

ENG 222: Concepts of Good and Evil in Literature (3)  A study of literary works with different countries and eras that reflect on the causes, nature, and consequences of evil. Special focus on development of ethical principles and decision-making. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal B1: Ethics. Prereq: ENG 101.

BGS 201: The Ethics of Global Engagement (3)
This course builds the student’s capacity for civic engagement, providing a philosophical basis for service in Western and Eastern traditions, giving a global context for issues the student will address, developing relevant skills such as leadership, understanding diversity, and small group dynamics, and providing the opportunity to work on issues of interest to the student in a supportive environment.
Prereq: ENG 101

HA 356: Ethics and Health Care in a Pluralistic Society (3) The course will provide students with an ethical framework for decision-making in the context of a pluralistic society.  Models and principles of ethical justification among a diversity of cultures and belief systems will be analyzed.  Specific applications are made to concerns in clinical and healthcare management.  Topics include the right to healthcare, community health ethics, end-of-life issues, and organizational ethics.  F, Sp

PHIL 200: Intro to Philosophy (3)  The nature of philosophy and its problems. No prereq. F, Sp, Su

PHIL 201: Intro to Ethics (3)  An in-depth study of issues in practical or applied ethics. No prereq. F, Sp, Su

PHIL 312: Ethics in the Professions (3)  Provides participants with the foundation for understanding and applying ethical standards and analysis in professional careers, including but not limited to business, engineering, law, mass media, and medicine. The course will survey contemporary ethical theories and explore the ethical codes, standards, and practices specific to the student's chosen career. Prereq: juniors or senior standing and permission of instructor

PHIL 363: Bioethics (3)  A critical survey of the ethical issues generated by research and practice in the fields of biology and medicine. Prereq: one philosophy course or consent of instructor. F, Sp, Su

B2. The Arts 3 hours

ART 201: Introduction to the Visual Arts (3)  A basic survey of the media, elements, and organization of painting, graphics, sculpture, and architecture. Art 201 is not acceptable for Art Majors in B2 The Arts. No prereq. F, Sp

ART 353: Nineteenth Century European and U.S. American Art (3)  Covers the major movements in the period c. 1780-1880, emphasizing Romanticism, Neo Classicism, Realism, and Impressionism. Prereq: HUM 221 and 222 or consent of instructor. Sp

ART 354: 20th Century European and American Art (3)  The continuation of ART 353 covering the major movements in the period c. 1880-1980, including Post Impressionism, Cubism, Fauvism, Expressionism, DaDa, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, Pop, the Muralists, and non objective art. Prereq: HUM 221 and 222 or consent of instructor. F

CMST 203: Introduction to Performance Studies (3) This course will serve two purposes. First, operating on the theory that literature is best understood and appreciated when performed, this course is designed to give students experience performing and analyzing literature. In addition, this course will introduce the many ways we experience performance in our everyday lives. B2, F

ENG 105: Introduction to Literature (3)  An introduction to literature emphasizing the ability to read critically. Topics vary. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal B2: The Arts. No prereq. F, Sp, Su

ENG 255: Introduction to British Literary History (3) ENG 255 examines the historical development of British literature, from the Anglo-Saxon invasions that catalyzed the birth of a British national identity and brought Beowulf into the literature of England, through the contentious development of this national identity into a global power, to Britain’s 20th century post-colonial status. By concentrating on representative or "canonical" works as well as those conventionally under-represented, the course will provide students with the background necessary to understand British literary works in their social, political, and cultural contexts. Prerequisite: English 101 or equivalent. Meets Core Curriculum Goal B2: The Arts. F, Sp

ENG 265: Introduction to American Literary History (3) ENG 265 provides an overview of the main currents in the development of American literature, from its beginnings in pre-colonial times, through its reliance on and then struggle against British and European themes and forms, to its 20th-century development into the many voices of an uneasily multi-ethnic world power. By historically situating representative works from within the canon as well as from voices traditionally excluded or under-represented, the course will provide students with the background necessary to understand literature as the product of and often as challenging this background. Prereq: English 101 or equivalent. Meets Core Curriculum Goal B2: The Arts. F, Sp

ENG 285: Introduction to Film (3)  An introductory examination of motion pictures as an art form. Students attend a series of selected films and discuss and evaluate them with respect to theme and technique. Critical principles are examined, and basic dramatic, literary, and photographic principles of cinema are investigated. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal B2: The Arts. No prereq. F, Sp

ENG 286: Classical Mythology (3)  A study of the mythologies of the Near Eastern, Cretan, Greek, Roman, and Northern European civilizations. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal B2: The Arts. Prereq. ENG 201. F

ENG 302: Creative Writing (3)  Inquiry into the creative process. Students will write poems, short fiction, and dramatic scenes with critical analysis and discussion by the instructor and class. Meets the University Core Curriculum Goal B2: The Arts. Prereq: ENG 201 or consent of instructor. F, Sp

ENG 330: Ethnic Literature in America (3)  A survey of significant minority contributions to literature, particularly Black-American, but including Native-American, Asian-American, and Mexican-American. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal B2: The Arts and C2: Individual Development/Social Behavior. Prereq: 62 semester hours of credit or consent of instructor. Sp 

ENG 382: Literature of the Bible I (3) Literary study of the Torah and Prophets of the Hebrew Bible, in English translation. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal B2: The Arts. Prereq: sophomore standing or consent of instructor.

FREN 275: The French Film (3) Weekly showings and discussions of French films. Analysis of the thematic and artistic diversity from its beginnings in the early 20th century to the present. (course taught in English) Prereq: none.

GERM 275: The German Film (3) Weekly showings and discussions of German films. Analysis of the thematic and artistic diversity from its beginnings in the early 20th century to the present. (course taught in English) Prereq: none.

MUS 202: Introduction to Music (3)  A basic survey of the media elements and organizational patterns of the art of music. No prereq.

SPAN 275: The Hispanic Film (3) Weekly showings and discussions of Hispanic films. Analysis of the thematic and artistic diversity from its beginnings in the early 20th century to the present. (course taught in English) Prereq: none.

THTR 101: Introduction to Theatre (3)  Analysis of the nature of theatre, its origin, and development from the standpoint of the play, the physical theatre, and its place in culture. Specific emphasis is placed on the study of styles and the various artistic components which "collaborate" to create theatre. No prereq. F, Sp, Su

B3. Health/Fitness 2 hours

PED 186: Wellness/Fitness Appraisal (1)  Students will assess present level of physical fitness and wellness and establish behavior modification strategies to address areas which need improvement.  Topics of discussion include nutrition, weight control, components of physical fitness, stress management, tobacco use and addictive behaviors, and sexually transmitted diseases.  Meets University Core Curriculum Goal B3: Health/Fitness.

PED 281: Personal Health Science (3)  Examination of attitudes, research facts, and misconceptions pertaining to personal health needs and practices, nutrition, family living, sexuality, drug use and abuse, disease prevention, safety, first aid, and public health resources. Sp, F, Su

Ped 287: Physical Education and the Elementary School Classroom Teacher (2) Provides students with the basic information about teaching physical education to children in elementary school. Develop, participate in, and teach developmentally appropriate physical activities for children in grades 1-6 including classroom, recess/playground, wellness, fitness, and integrated activities. Sp, Su, F

BIOL 176: Nutrition (3)  A study of the nutrients, their availability in foods, mechanisms of digestion, absorption and assimilation into body tissues. Also included will be a study of special conditions relating to nutrition. Does not apply toward a major or minor in biology.  One semester college chemistry recommended, (3-0), Sp 

NUTR 376: Principles and Applications in Nutrition (3) Principles and applications in nutrition emphasizes the relationships among the nutrients and how homeostasis relationships are maintained in the healthy person. Likewise, imbalances and dietary counseling for their corrections will be emphasized.  Special attention to nutrition for the developing human and lectures focusing on nutrition counseling will address the needs of the health professionals seeking concepts in applied nutrition. Prereq: MATH 108 and CHEM 107 recommended. F, Sp, Su

OT 310: Applied Pathophysiology I  This course begins with an introduction to occupational performance (areas, components, and contexts) and an integrated theoretical approach. The course proceeds with an overview of the etiology, clinical course, management  and prognosis of congenital and developmental disabilities, acute and chronic disease processes, and traumatic injuries, and examines the effects of such conditions on functional performance throughout the life span as well as explores the effects of wellness on the individual, family, culture, and society. This course has been approved for the one-hour non-activity requirement of Category B3. Health/Fitness of the University Core Curriculum. Sp, Su

PED Activities Course (100 level)   [Descriptions can be found in the USI Bulletin.]

PED 295: Physical Education for the Classroom Teacher (3)  Provides students with basic information about teaching elementary school physical education. Participation in activities for children in grades 1-6. Elementary Education majors only or consent of instructor. Sp, F, Su 

C. The World: Enhancement of Cultural and Natural Awareness (26-27 hours)

C1. History 3 hours

EDUC 173: History of Schooling in America 1620-Present (3) Survey of US schooling, beginning with the earliest Massachusetts laws and schools and continuing to No Child Left Behind in the 21st century. In this course students use primary documents to study a dynamic and contentious aspect of US history.

HIST 101: The United States to 1865 (3)  A survey of United States history from colonial times through the Civil War. Majors in elementary education must take History 101 or 102. No prereq. Sp, Su, F

HIST 102: The United States since 1865 (3)  The survey of United States history from the end of the Civil War to the present. Majors in elementary education must take History 101 or 102. No prereq. Sp, Su, F

HIST 111: World Civilizations I, Beginnings to 1500 (3)  The development of the major civilizations, Western and Non-Western, from their beginnings to 1500. The cultural achievements of these civilizations are studied in their historical contexts. Majors in elementary education must take History 111 or 112. No prereq. Sp, Su, F

HIST 112: World Civilizations II, 1500-Present (3)  The development of the major civilizations, Western and Non-Western, from 1500 to the present. The cultural achievements of these civilizations are studied in their historical contexts. Majors in elementary education must take History 111 or 112. No prereq. Sp, Su, F

HIST 130: Issues in American History (3)  A selection of issues which focus on understanding aspects of American history within a national and global framework. This course offers first and second-year students an alternative to History 101 and/or 102. May be taken twice for credit toward history major or minor. No prereq.

HIST 140: Issues in World History (3)  A selection of issues which focus on understanding particular aspects of world history within a global framework. This course offers first and second-year students an alternative to History 111 or 112. May be taken twice for credit toward history major or minor. No prereq.

C2. Individual Development/Social Behavior 6 hours

ANTH 101: Introduction to Anthropology (3)  A survey of the disciplines of anthropology: physical anthropology, archaeology, cultural anthropology, linguistics, and applied anthropology. The nature of language and culture and the processes of biological and sociocultural evolution are major topics examined. No prereq. F, Sp

ANTH 121: Introduction to Archaeology (3)  An introduction to archaeological theories, concepts and methods, and their application in the reconstruction of both prehistoric and historic cultures. This course include laboratory sessions during class periods and a weekend field project. No prereq.

ECON 175: Fundamentals of Economics (3)  An introduction to basic economic terms and concepts, such as scarcity, opportunity cost, trade, markets, prices, competition, unemployment, inflation, business cycles, and growth. Special emphasis is given to the application of these terms and concepts to choices which individuals face everyday and to current social problems. F, Sp

ECON 208: Principles of Microeconomics (3)  An introductory analysis of individual decision-making in a market system. Topics include market price determination, the influence of prices and costs on consumer and producer behavior, and the importance of seller competition. Prereq: MATH 111 or its equivalent. F, Sp, Su

ECON 209: Principles of Macroeconomics (3)  An introductory analysis of overall economic activity, including income, production, employment, and prices. Alternative theories of, and policies toward, economic stabilization and growth are examined. Prereq: MATH 111 or its equivalent. F, Sp, Su

EDUC 302: Multicultural Education (3)  The purpose of this course is to explore the theory and knowledge base that supports multi-cultural education and an awareness of diversity within American society .  Topics may include the critical study of issues as they relate to race and ethnicity, exceptionality, language and dialect, religion, gender, and age.  Field experience may be required. Prereq: EDUC 201 or 202 or 242. F, Sp, Su

ENG 330: Ethnic Literature in America (3)  A survey of significant minority contributions to literature, particularly Black-American, but including Native-American, Asian-American, and Mexican-American. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal B2: The Arts and C2: Individual Development/Social Behavior. Prereq: 62 semester hours of credit or consent of instructor. Sp

GNDR 111:Introduction to Gender Studies (3)  This course is designed to familiarize students with the many ways gender is understood and studied.  Its emphasis is interdisciplinary and multi-cultural.  Instructors and guest faculty will offer lectures on gender topics in the presenters' fields of expertise.  These topics will be drawn from the humanities and social sciences as well as other disciplines within and beyond Liberal Arts.

POLS 102: Introduction to American Politics (3)  Explores the basic elements of the American political process and the institutions of American national government. Provides a foundation for the study of American government and politics. No prereq. F, Sp, Su

PSY 201: Introduction to Psychology (3)  A survey of basic concepts and methods of psychology as a behavioral science and seeks to develop an understanding of the individual and social forces that influence and direct behavior. Prereq. for all other psychology courses. F, Sp, Su

SOC 121: Principles of Sociology (3)  An examination of social dynamics and consequences of social life. The main topics are culture, social groups, socialization, deviance, social stratification, race relations, gender, and family. It is required of majors and minors. No prereq. F, Sp, Su

SOC 231: Social Problems (3)  Examination of the nature, extent, causes, and effects of selected contemporary social problems, such as gender, sexual behavior, drugs, environment, economic inequality, racial inequality, crime, and education. Prereq: SOC 121. F, Sp 

SOC 251: Principles of Social Psychology (3)  A general consideration of human behavior in social situations with particular emphasis on the communications processes, socialization, social role, social self, and social groupings. Prereq: SOC 121.

SOC 261: Marriage and Family (3)  The course examines the research about the family life cycle. The specific areas investigated are sex roles, a history of the American family, dating, sexual behavior, marriage, childbirth, children, the middle-aged, the elderly, divorce, and step-parenting. Prereq: SOC 121. F, Sp 

C3. Science (L = lab course 8-9 hours (at least one lab)

ANTH 131: Introduction to Physical Anthropology (3) This course examines fundamental aspects of the physical nature of humans and human variability. It selectively reviews the long record of human biological adaptations that have existed from the appearance of the earliest Hominids up to the development of anatomically modern forms. Topics include principles of evolution, human variation and adaptability, non-human primate behavior, human and nonhuman osteology (study of the skeleton), and the human fossil record.

ASTR 201(L): General Astronomy (4)  An introduction to the basic concepts in astronomy. Use of the telescope and exercises in uranography are stressed. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal C3: Science. Prereq: Sophomore standing

BIOL 105 (L): Biology of Human Concern (3)  General concepts in the life sciences, stressing those fundamental to life processes and of human concern. This course is not for biology majors or minors.  (2-1) F, Sp Su

BIOL 112(L): Ethnobotany  Examination of human uses of plants and the cultural/societal origins of usage. Plants for medicine and health, food, beverage, protection, aesthetics, and recreation will be discussed. Basic concepts in cell biology, genetics, plant taxonomy/identification, plant anatomy, and plant physiology typical of Introductory Biology for non-majors courses will be covered. Through the lab, students will gain experience that will reinforce concepts from lecture. Students will work through the scientific method and use some of the basic tools used in the study of science. Students may take for credit either BIOL 111 or BIOL 112. There will be opportunities for students to work through open-ended laboratory experiences. Does not apply toward a major or minor in biology. No prereq. (3-1) Sp

BIOL 114(L):Understanding Evolution with Lab (4) An introduction to the science of biological evolution, from the history of evolutionary thought to the concepts of modern evolutionary theory. Readings, videos, and discussions will examine the processes of organic evolution, the history of life on earth, and the impact that evolutionary thinking has had on the development of the modern Western world view. The nature and process of science as a way of understanding will be stressed throughout. Students will gain experience with thinking and writing about scientific topics. In the lab exercises, students will apply scientific principles to formulate and answer questions and reinforce concepts introduced in lecture with hands-on experiences. Does not apply towards a major or minor in biology.  Does not apply toward a major or minor in biology.  No prereq: (3-1)

BIOL 121: Human Anatomy and Physiology I (4)  An introduction to biological and chemical principles as they apply to the human body. Lectures and laboratory work will cover cellular anatomy and physiology, tissues, and the following systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, and endocrine. (2-1) Prereq: college chemistry strongly recommended or concurrent. F, Sp, Su

BIOL 122 (L): Human Anatomy and Physiology II (4)  A continuation of Biology 121 consisting of lectures and laboratory work concerning the following systems: respiratory, cardiovascular, lymphatic, digestive, excretory, and reproductive. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal C3: Science. (2-1) Prereq: BIOL 121 required. F, Sp, Su

BIOL 133 (L):Biological concepts (4) This lecture/laboratory course will cover biological concepts i the context of current issues in Biology. Students will become more familiar with the scientific method as it applies to Biology.  Topics to be covered include Science and Ethics; Evolution and Biodiversity; Ecology; Genetics; Cellular Biology.  The lab will reinforce concepts from lecture.  This course will not apply towards a major or minor in Biology. Prereq: ENG 100 (or placement into higher level English), MATH 100 (or placement into higher level MATH), GENS 099.

BIOL 141:Principles of Biology (4) An introductory survey of the fundamental characteristics and process of living organisms, including cell structure and function, energetics, genetics, development, evolution, and ecology. Laboratories include both didactic and investigative explorations of these processes. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal C3: Science. (3-1) Prereq: Placement into ENG 100 or higher ENG writing course, C or better in MATH 100 or placement into higher level college MATH course, and science major or consent of instructor. F, Sp, Su

BIOL 151 (L): Botany (4)  Fundamentals of plant structure and function are explored in the context of plant diversity and evolution. Consideration is given to variation in plant morphological and physiological strategies for life in a different environment. A course for majors and minors in biology. (2-1) Prereq: BIOL 141. F, Sp

BIOL 152 (L): Zoology (3)  A survey of the adaptations and taxonomic relationships of the major animal phyla with emphasis on evolutionary trends. Primarily for majors and minors in biology. (2-1) Prereq: BIOL 141. F, Sp

BIOL 176: Nutrition (3)  A study of the nutrients, their availability in foods, mechanisms of digestion, absorption and assimilation into body tissues. Also included will be a study of special conditions relating to nutrition. Does not apply toward a major or minor in biology.  One semester college chemistry recommended, (3-0), Sp 

BIOL 208 (L): Wildlife Biology (3)  The course will address basic principles of wildlife ecology and their application in the management of wildlife ecology and their application in the management of wildlife populations.  Topics include population growth, censusing, food habits, predation, harvesting, disease, exotic and endangered species, captive animal management, and conservation.  Laboratories will include indoor and outdoor exercises in sampling, habitat evaluation, censusing, and wildlife observation.  (2-1) F, alternate years

BIOL 251: Environmental Conservation (3)  This course is designed to introduce students to the basic scientific principles needed to understand the interdisciplinary and multinational (multicultural) nature of environmental issues and concerns. Through a series of lectures, discussions, and videotapes the students will be introduced to environmental issues from scientific viewpoints as well as political, economic, social, and philosophical realms. (3-0) F, Sp, Su

BIOL 282: Heredity and Society (3)  An introduction to the principles of human heredity, nature, and expression of genetic material. The medical and social implications of genetics are explored. Biology majors may not enroll. Prereq: BIOL 105 and chemistry recommended. (3-0) F

BIOL 285: Animal Behavior (3)  Using biological studies augmented with video clips, the diversity of animal behavior will be explored in the contexts of genetics, environment, ecology, and evolution.  Throughout the course, the process of science will be emphasized as a way to understand animal behavior.

CHEM 103: Molecules, Matter, and Me (3) This introductory chemistry class is designed to give knowledge and understanding of selected important facts and principles of chemistry. Topics such as nuclear energy, radiation, global warming, and ozone depletion are investigated. (3-0) F, Sp, Su

CHEM 107 (L): Elements in Everyday Chemistry (4)  An introductory chemistry course that uses selected important facts and principles to explain interesting phenomena such as global warming, ozone depletion, nuclear energy, acid rain, etc. A laboratory experience enhances the understanding of chemistry. (3-1) F, Sp, Su

CHEM 141 (L): Principles of Chemistry (4)  Selected principles and applications of inorganic, physical, organic, and biochemistry with laboratory experiments illustrating the principles covered. Prereq: working knowledge of algebra. (3-1) F, Sp, Su

CHEM 175 (L): Survey of Chemical Concepts (4) A broad introduction to chemical concepts selected to enhance the background of beginning science majors. Prereq: high school chemistry or consent of instructor. (3-1) F

CHEM 261 (L): General Chemistry I (4)  A systematic study of the essential nomenclature, hypothesis, theories, and laws of chemistry necessary for chemistry majors and minors. Some of the topics presented in the course include stoichiometry, atomic structure, thermochemistry, solutions, crystal structure, and gas laws. Prereq: MATH 111 or 118 or CHEM 175 or consent of instructor. (3-1) F, Sp, Su

CHEM 262 (L): General Chemistry II (4)  A continuation of 161 with some laboratory work in qualitative analysis. Some of the topics presented include kinetics, equilibrium, ionic equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, nuclear and organic chemistry. Prereq: CHEM 261 or equivalent. (3-1) F, Sp, Su

GEOG 112: Earth System Science (3)  The study of the whole Earth as a system of many interacting parts. Including the solar system, the Earth's internal systems and landform, ocean, atmospheric and climatic systems, and global ecosystems. Applies the scientific method to the study of changes within and between these systems. No prereq. (3-0) UCC, Sp

GEOG 215: Climatology (3)  Classification and distribution of the world's climates. Factors that control climate. Changing climates, and predictions for the future. Prereq: GEOG 112 or 214. (3-0) UCC, Sp

GEOL 101: Prehistoric Life (3)  Scientific study of the history of life on earth. Emphasis on higher vertebrate groups such as reptiles and mammals Discussion on current theories of dinosaur habits and mass extinction. No prereq. (3-0) UCC, F

GEOL 115: Landscapes and Geology of North America (3)  A study of the geography and geology of North American landscapes with Special reference to the United States. Factors in landscape development, including climate, vegetation, erosion, glaciation, tectonics, and human influences are explored in the context of specific landform. No prereq. (3-0) UCC, F

GEOL 121: Geology of Gemstones (3)  An introduction to major gemstones, their geological origin, the science of their physical properties and identification, and their role in the impact on human civilization. This course is a survey of several major concepts in physical and environmental geology through the lens of gemstones. No prereq. (3-0) UCC, F, Su

GEOL 131: Geology, the Environment, and Society (3)  An examination of the controls on human activity by geology, and, the impact of humans on natural geologic processes. This course is a survey of fundamental geologic processes and associated hazards (energy, minerals, water), and topics such as pollution and land-use planning. The course provides an opportunity to discuss, from a geologic perspective, the ramification of and potential solutions to problems associated with Earth's resources. No prereq. (3-0) UCC, Sp

GEOL 132:Volcanoes and Eruptions (3) An introduction to volcanoes, their occurrence, different styles of eruption, and the processes that control volcanic activity, emphasizing the impacts of volcanism, both beneficial and destructive, to human beings and the global environment. No prereq.

GEOL 151 (L):Geology of America's National Parks (3) This course examines principles of physical geology through the medium of America's national parks.  Parks that were designated because of their unique geologic setting will be studied to understand the full range of geologic materials and internal Earth processes.  Prereq: MATH 100 or placement in MATH 111. (3-1) UCC, F

GEOL 161 (L): Physical Geology (4)  Lecture and laboratory studies of the materials, internal structure, and surface features of the earth, and the processes which have shaped them. No prereq. (3-1) UCC, Sp

GEOL 162 (L): Historical Geology (3)  Lecture and laboratory studies of the evolution of the earth and its life forms. Techniques used to interpret earth and life history. The concept of geologic time. No prereq. (3-0) UCC, Sp

GEOL 234:The Oceans: Past, Present, and Future (3)  Origin and history of the oceans, including evolution of ocean basins and sea water.  Causes and effects of oceanic circulation.  Interaction of oceans and climate.  The oceans as a habitat for life.  Challenges of protecting oceanic environments.  Problems in exploiting the oceans for mineral wealth and food.  Effects of global warming and rising sea levels.  Prereqs:  GEOG 112 or GEOL 161, and working knowledge of basic chemistry and biology. (3-0)

PHYS 101: Introduction to the Physical Sciences (3)  Lectures and demonstrations of physics at a primarily conceptual level. Basic problem solving and the scientific method are introduced. Topics covered include Newton's Law, energy, momentum, light, electricity, magnetism, thermodynamics, fluids, and selected topics from modern physics. (3-0)

PHYS 175 (L): General Physics I (4)  Review of metric system and vectors, the laws of motion and applications, work and energy, states of matter and molecular properties, heat and thermodynamics. Calculus is not employed in this course. Prereq: MATH 111 and 112; or MATH 118 or placement test into MATH 230. (3-1)

PHYS 176 (L): General Physics II (4)  Wave motion and acoustics, electrostatic fields and potentials, electric current and circuit theory, magnetic fields, optics and the wave properties of light, atomic and nuclear physics. A continuation of Physics 175. Prereq: 175. (3-1)

PHYS 205 (L): Intermediate Physics I (5)  An initial study of the phenomena and concepts of classical and modern physics in the areas of mechanics including energy and momentum principles, and heat and thermodynamics, with application involving elementary calculus. An integrated laboratory serves to develop associated skills in measurement. Required of physics majors, minors, and pre-engineering students. Prereq: MATH 230. (4-1)

PHYS 206 (L): Intermediate Physics II (5)  A continuation of Physics 205 in the areas of wave motion, acoustics, optics, electrostatics, circuit electricity, magnetism, and modern physics. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal C3: Science. Required of physics majors, minors, and pre-engineering students. Prereq: PHYS 205, MATH 230. (4-1)

PHYS 207: Intermediate Physics I excluding Laboratory (4)  Physics 207 is identical with Physics 205 except the laboratory is excluded. This is intended for students who have previously acquired credit for the general physics laboratory by having completed course 175 or who have equivalent in laboratory experience. (4-0)

PHYS 208: Intermediate Physics II excluding Laboratory (4)  Physics 208 is identical to Physics 206 except the laboratory is excluded. This is intended for students who have previously acquired credit for the general physics laboratory by having completed course 176 or who have the equivalent laboratory experience. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal C3: Science. (4-0)

C4. Western Culture 6 hours

One Humanities course from each set following. (Each course title begins " The Western Tradition in ....")

HUM 211: The Western Tradition in the Humanities I (3)  A survey of the major thought and art of the Ancient and Medieval worlds as reflected in their literature, fine arts, and philosophy. Fulfills the first half of the Western Culture component of the University Core Curriculum. Prereq: ENG 101 and CMST 101 or 107. F, Sp

HUM 221: The Western Tradition in Art History I (3)  An introduction to the major thought and art of Western culture through a study of its art and architecture. This course will focus on the Ancient and Medieval worlds. Fulfills the first half of the Western Culture component of the University Core Curriculum. Prereq: ENG 101 and CMST 101 or 107. F, Sp

HUM 231: The Western Tradition in Philosophy I (3)  An introduction to the major thought and art of Western culture though a study of the great philosophies. This course will focus on the Ancient and Medieval worlds. Fulfills the first half of the Western Culture component of the University Core Curriculum. Prereq: ENG 101 and CMST 101 or 107. Alternate years

HUM 241: The Western Tradition in Literature I (3)  An introduction to the major thought and art of Western culture through a study of its literature. This course will focus on the Ancient and Medieval worlds. Fulfills the first half of the Western Culture component of the University Core Curriculum. Prereq: ENG 101 and CMST 101 or 107. F, Sp

HUM 212: The Western Tradition in the Humanities II (3)  A survey of the major thought and art of the Renaissance, Enlightenment, and Modern worlds as reflected in their literature, fine arts, and philosophy. Fulfills the second half of the Western Culture component of the University Core Curriculum. Prereq: ENG 101 and CMST 101 or 107. F, Sp

HUM 222: The Western Tradition in Art History II (3)  An introduction to the major thought and art of Western culture through a study of its art and architecture. This course will focus on the Renaissance, Enlightenment, and Modern Worlds. Fulfills the second half of the Western culture component of the University Core Curriculum. Prereq: ENG 101 and CMST 101 or 107. F, Sp

HUM 232: The Western Tradition in Philosophy II (3)  An introduction to the major thought and art of Western culture through a study of the great philosophers. This course will focus on the Renaissance, Enlightenment, and Modern worlds. Fulfills the second half of the Western Culture component of the University Core Curriculum. Prereq: ENG 101 and CMST 101 or 107. Alternate years

HUM 242: The Western Tradition in Literature II (3)  An introduction to the major thought and art of Western culture through a study of its literature. This course will focus on the Renaissance, Enlightenment, and Modern worlds. Fulfills the second half of the Western Culture component of the University Core Curriculum. Prereq: ENG 101 and CMST 101 or 107. F, Sp

FREN 203: Intermediate French I (3)  A thorough review of the French language system to include work in grammar, conversation, reading, and composition. Short readings and songs introduce the students to cultural and literary themes. Language of instruction: French. Prereq: French 102 or equivalent. F

FREN 204: Intermediate French II (3)  Continuation of French 203. Grammar review will include those structures not covered in 203, with a greater emphasis on composition. Readings from several time periods and genres continue the study of cultural and literary themes. Language of instruction: French. Prereq: French 203 or equivalent. Sp

GERM 203: Intermediate German I (3)  A thorough review of the German language system to include work in grammar, reading, composition, and conversation. Readings in the German short story and essay provide the students with the interpretive skills and an introduction to major literary and cultural themes. Language of instruction: German. Prereq: German 102 or equivalent. F

GERM 204: Intermediate German II (3)  A continuation of German 203. Grammar review will include those concepts not covered in 203. Class discussions on the short story and selected topics will increase the student's verbal ability in the language. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal C4: Western Tradition. Language of instruction: German. Prereq: German 203 or equivalent. Sp

LATN 203: Intermediate Latin I (3)  A thorough review of Latin grammar, syntax, vocabulary and reading skills.  Readings in Latin prose and poetry will provide students with an understanding of Roman culture and literature. Prereq: LATN 102 or equivalent. F

LATN 204: Intermediate Latin II (3)  Continuation of LATN 203. Review of grammar and syntax will include concepts not covered in Latin 203.  An emphasis on reading Latin prose and poetry to develop students' interpretive skills. Prereq: LATN 203 or equivalent. Sp

SPAN 203: Intermediate Spanish I (3) Continuation of SPAN 102. Emphasis on the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the cultural context of the Spanish speaking countries. In addition to the regular class meetings, students are required to complete one hour per week on the language lab. Prereq: Spanish 102 or equivalent. F

SPAN 204: Intermediate Spanish II (3) Continuation of SPAN 203. Emphasis on the four language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing in the cultural context of the Spanish speaking countries. In addition to the regular class meetings, students are required to complete one hour per week on the language lab. Prereq: Spanish 203 or equivalent. Sp

C5. Global Communities 3 hours

ANTH 111: World Culture (3) This is an introductory-level course to one of the three major subdisciplines in anthropology, cultural anthropology. The course will be devoted to the global, cross-cultural study of all aspects of human culture. Topics covered include technology, political economy, social organization, kinship, gender, religion, war, ethnicity, and cultural change in the modern world.

ANTH 251: Peoples of Latin America (3)   An introduction to the ethnology and ethnography of modern Latin America with emphases on: the Native-American peoples of the Andean highlands, southern Mexico and Guatemala, and the lowland rainforests; African-American peoples of the Caribbean Islands, the Guianas, and Brazil; the Brazilians and Luso-Brazilian culture; and the Spanish-speaking peoples and Hispanic culture in Cuba, Mexico, and urban Peru. Global issues are addressed including the drug trade and rainforest deforestation. No prereq. ANTH 101 recommended.

ANTH 255: The Cultures of Asia (3)  An introduction to the societies and cultures of Asia: China; Japan; Southeast Asia with emphases on Malaysia, Indonesia, and Vietnam; and Central Asia with special attention to Mongolia, Tibet, and the Turkic-speaking peoples of western China and Kazakhstan. No prereq.

ANTH 262: Archaeology of North America (3)  Designed to introduce students to the cultural history of North America before European conquest, focusing on the processes of social and cultural evolution. No prereq. ANTH 101 or ANTH 261 recommended.

ART 253: Ancient Mexico (3)  The Art of Mesoamerica and the development of civilization in Mesoamerica located in southern Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and Honduras; examination of the Olmec, Maya, Aztec, and other groups, as well as the period of conquest and current conditions among the native peoples of the region. No prereq. Sp

BIOL 251: Environmental Conservation (3) This course is designed to introduce students to the basic scientific principles needed to understand the interdisciplinary and multinational (multicultural) nature of environmental issues and concerns. Through a series of lectures, discussions, and videotapes the student will be introduced to environmental issues from scientific viewpoints as well as political, economic, social, and philosophical realms. (3-0) F, Sp, Su

BGS 201: The Ethics of Global Engagement (3)
This course builds the student’s capacity for civic engagement, providing a philosophical basis for service in Western and Eastern traditions, giving a global context for issues the student will address, developing relevant skills such as leadership, understanding diversity, and small group dynamics, and providing the opportunity to work on issues of interest to the student in a supportive environment.
Prereq: ENG 101

CMST 317:Intercultural Communication (3) This exploration of cross-cultural communication surveys intercultural theories and problems in communication. It offers a general orientation to intercultural communication, theorizes intercultural transactions, and provides insight into cultural differences. Prereq: CMST 107 or consent of instructor; junior standing. C5. Sp

ECON 241: Global Economic Issues (3)  An introduction to the causes and consequences of the growing economic interdependence of nations. Emphasis is placed on how different people, cultures, institutions, and economies are affected by, and respond to, current global issues. Prereq: ECON 175 or 208 or 209, or consent of instructor. F, Sp, Su

ENG 231: African American Literature  A course which examines the African American literary tradition, covering representative works from the African pre-colonial and modern periods, nineteenth century American, the Harlem Renaissance, to the present.  Included are works by African and African American authors from the oral and written traditions of poetry, drama, and prose. 

ENG 386: World Mythology (3)  An examination of the major cultural mythologies from around the world for cross-cultural comparisons and contrasts. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal C.5: Global Communities. Prereq: ENG 201 and sophomore standing. Sp

FOREIGN LANGUAGE 102: Beginning II [Descriptions can be found in the USI Bulletin.]

GEOG 330: World Geography (3)  An interpretation of human activities in selected world regions. Designed to assist students in acquiring certain basic ideas and supporting facts about contemporary world geography. The course surveys the importance, geographical characteristics, and basic problems of the major regions of the world. (3-0) UCC, F

HIST 365: Crusades (3)  An intensive study of the holy wars between Western Europe and Islam that took place in the Holy Land and Europe from the late eleventh century to the late fifteenth century. Special emphasis is placed on an analysis of the crusading ideal, the motivations of the crusaders, the changes in crusade ideology as well as Muslim response to Christian military attacks. Cross-cultural exchanges between Christians, Muslims and Jews in the territories affected by the crusades are also examined. Prereq: sophomore standing

HP 236: Eastern Medicine and Alternative/Complementary Health Care (3) This is a course designed to study Eastern medicine and its influence on complementary healthcare therapies. Emphasis is on historical, cultural, social, research, and consumer interest influences on the evolving model of east-west healing and healthcare. Specific modalities will be studied with emphasis on utilization for self-care and their use in healthcare. Implications for changes in healthcare environments and healthcare provider roles also will be analyzed.

HP 492: Transcultural Health Care in the Global Community (3)  This multi disciplinary course is designed for students interested in learning about transcultural populations of people and the relationship of culture to health and health care. Included in the course will be a visit to examine transcultural health in the global community. Services projects included during the visit will provide clinical and community education opportunities in a variety of sites and will promote interdisciplinary responses to health care issues in the cultural context of the community.

INST 213: Magic in Arts/Humanities (3) A survey of world magic, its origins and influence on literature, architecture, art, music, theatre, film, religion and medicine from antiquity to present. Prereq: None

INST 389: World Literature in Translation (3) Readings in world literature in translation in cultural context.  Selections and themes may vary per offering.  May be taken twice for credit if topic varied.  Prereq: ENG 201 and sophomore standing.

PHIL 211: Introduction to the Study of World Religions (3) (changed to PHIL 251)

PHIL 251: Introduction to the Study of World Religions (3) An introductory survey course designed to expose students to the scholarly methods, disciplines, and topics involved in the academic study of religions. F

POLS 271: International Politics (3) An introduction to the study of interstate political relations, power, nationalism, and international organizations; discussion of current trends in international affairs. No prereq. F, Sp

SOCW 392:Global Social Work (3)  This course is designed for students seeking to increase their global awareness by engaging in social service work outside of the United States.  Included in the course is a visit to another country where students will apply social work skills and values through service learning activities. Prereq:  SOCW 221, Permission of instructor and sophomore standing required.

D. The Synthesis: Integration and Application of Knowledge (3 hours)

D. Synthesis 3 hours

BIOL 481: Organic Evolution (3)  A discussion of the science of evolution and how evolutionary theory can explain the diversity of life on earth.  Topics include evidence for macroevolution, the history of evolutionary thought, adaptation, population genetics, speciation, and human evolution. (3-0) Prereq: BIOL 215; junior status in science or consent of instructor. F, Sp

CS 483:Senior Software Development Project (3) This course applies computer programming and software engineering concepts, principles, and practices to a comprehensive system development project. A team approach is used to analyze the problem and then specify, design, implement, test, validate, and deliver a software package that solves the problem. Teams will use software engineering techniques and project management techniques, including milestones and formal presentations, to create and test the package solution to the system problem. Prereq: CS 201, 301, 365, CIS 301, 315, 367, 375, 377.

DTHY 401: Clinical Management I (3)  This course provides the student with periodontal client management experiences, focusing on assessment, care planning, implementation of treatment strategies, maintenance, and evaluation. Treatment experiences are integrated into clinic management activities and oral presentations. Evaluation of client treatment by associate degree students enrolled in the dental hygiene program is incorporated. F

DTHY 457: Professional and Current Issues in Oral Health Care (3) This course presents professional dental hygiene topics from a historical, economic, legal/ethical, global, political, social, interdisciplinary and multicultural framework. Students will investigate current issues in the field of dental hygiene education, examine ethical and legal concerns in the practice of dental hygiene, and explore the accelerating need for access to care. Students will develop solutions which could be used to influence organizational, institutional, and governmental decisions impacting oral health care. Prereq: DTHY 441 - Dental Hygiene Theory III or permission of the instructor.

EDUC 433: Synthesis Seminar in Early Childhood Education (3) Capstone Seminar in early childhood teaching. A pre-professional course which provides a synthesis of interdisciplinary knowledge and pedagogical practices. Integrates knowledge gained from the University Core Curriculum, subject area coursework and professional education core. The course also examines case studies which present issues faced by teaching professionals in early childhood settings. Prereq: permission of director of student teaching.

EDUC 438:Synthesis Seminar in Special Education (3) Capstone Seminar in Special Education.  A pre-professional course which provides a synthesis of interdisciplinary knowledge and pedagogical practices. Integrates knowledge gained from the University Core Curriculum, subject area coursework and professional education core. The course also examines case studies which present issues faced by teaching professionals in school settings. Prereq permission of director of student teaching.

EDUC 448: Synthesis Seminar in Secondary Teaching (3)  Capstone Seminar in Secondary Teaching. A pre-professional course which provides a synthesis of interdisciplinary knowledge and pedagogical practices. Integrates knowledge gained from the University Core Curriculum, subject area coursework, and professional education core. The course also examines case studies which present issues faced by teaching professionals in secondary school settings. Prereq: permission of director of student teaching. F, Sp

EDUC 458: Synthesis Seminar in Elementary Teaching (3)  Capstone Seminar in Elementary Teaching.  A pre-professional course which provides a synthesis of interdisciplinary knowledge and pedagogical practices.  Integrates knowledge gained from the University Core Curriculum, subject area coursework, and professional education core. The course also examines case studies which present issues faced by teaching professionals in elementary school settings. Prereq: permission of director of student teaching. F, Sp

ENGR 491:Senior Design  A course which provides an opportunity for synthesis of technical, professional, and general knowledge for engineering students. Design problems provided by industrial sponsors are studied by small teams of students to develop solutions using engineering design, while considering realistic constraints such as economic factors, safety, reliability, aesthetics, ethics and social impact. Formal written and oral reports to faculty, industrial sponsors, and invited guests are required. Prereq: senior standing in engineering and consent of department chair.

GENS 498:Personal and Professional Development (3) An interdisciplinary study of adult development and autobiography, including aspects of psychosocial, moral and spiritual, and personal career development. Students will complete an integrated professional portfolio. Additionally, students will identify and complete an applied research project in a work setting that includes identification, analysis, research, solution and assessment of an actual problem or issue. Will satisfy University Core Curriculum requirement D: Synthesis for students seeking the Bachelor of General Studies. Others may enroll for elective credit. Prereq: Psy 201, senior standing, and consent of instructor.

GEOL 481: Advanced Environmental Geology (4)  Selected topics dealing with environmental geology, Earth resources, and land use. The course is conducted as group discussions centered on current and classical literature followed by field experiences. Extensive individual investigation is required. Prereq: GEOL 162 and consent of instructor. GEOL 441 is recommended. (3-1) UCC, Sp

HP 498: Current Concepts In the Health Professions (3)  This course examines the issues important to the health care professional from a historical, economical, legal/ethical, political, and multi cultural framework. Professionalism, negotiation, change agent, leadership, role theory, and role strategies are studied in relation to the health care professional. Topics will be selected based upon current trends in health care. F, Sp

LIBA 497: Capstone Studies (3)  A senior-level seminar designed for the synthesis category of the University Core Curriculum. Topics will change from semester to semester, but each offering will encourage students to draw on their educational experiences to develop interdisciplinary responses to a problem or issue in contemporary life. Open to students of any major or school. May not be repeated for credit without special permission from the Director of the LIBA program.  Prereq: senior standing or consent of director. (See available courses...)

MNGT 452: Policy Formulation and Implementation (3)  The capstone course utilizing all the major fields in business administration to allow the senior student to apply skills learned in these fields to situations dealing with the firm as a whole. The case study approach is used to encourage development of executive skills and to bridge the gap between the abstractions of college courses and the complexities of the business world. Prereq: MNGT 305, FIN 305, MKTG 305, and senior standing. F, Sp, Su

MATH 492: History of Mathematics (3)  An examination of the historical development of the main concepts, techniques and areas of mathematics along with the originating cultures and key personalities. The course may be taken during the professional semester. Prereq: 12 hours of mathematics courses in the major or consent of the instructor. Sp

NURS 467: Professional Nursing and Health Care Issues (3)  This course examines issues related to professional nursing and health care from a historical, economical, legal/ethnical, political, and multicultural framework. Strategies designed to influence organizational, institutional, and governmental decisions impacting nursing and health care are covered. Topics for discussion are selected based upon current issues and trends in nursing practice, nursing education, and health care. Meets University Core Curriculum Goal D: Synthesis. Prereq: completion of two 400-level clinical nursing courses. Sp, Su

NUTR 496:Leadership and Professional Issues in Food and Nutrition (3)  This course will explore current political, regulatory, ethical, training, quality improvement, management, and other important related issues facing food and nutrition professionals.  Students will use their educational foundation to investigate, identify, and suggest alternative methods of resolving these problems.  The course will examine the leadership roles of food and nutrition professionals.  Students will apply this knowledge by investigating current controversial issues in food and nutrition and will develop solutions to these problems.  Prereq: NUTR 285 and junior or senior standing. F

OT 480: Occupational Therapy Research (3)  This course is designed to provide the student opportunities to synthesize the requisite foundation of liberal arts and sciences (including biology, psychology, sociology, English, communications, and ethics) with the professional sequence of occupational therapy coursework. Following an introduction that covers the philosophical underpinnings of inquiry, the importance of research, the two traditions of research including process stages and essential components, basic versus applied research, and rigor in research, students utilize discovery learning in six areas of inquiry: single system design research (with quantitative analysis), qualitative research, action research, focus group research, advanced quantitative research, and outcome evaluation. Students enter this course having conducted and presented two research studies (of which at least one utilized a single system design) at the Occupational Therapy Program's end-of-the-semester conferences and completed one survey methods project in the past as well as having studied both descriptive statistics and nonparametric inferential statistics in previous occupational therapy courses.  This course has been approved for Category D: Synthesis of the University Core Curriculum. F.

PED 492: Contemporary Issues in Sport and Exercise (3)  This course will enable students to integrate information from their educational experiences to critically examine and analyze contemporary issues in sport and exercise from an interdisciplinary perspective. Current issues, trends, and challenges will be presented with the intent of provoking thought and stimulating debate, so that students may identify their role in the resolution of issues. Su

RADT491: Integration of Advanced Imaging Concepts (3) This course explores the current issues of the imaging sciences from a historical, legal/ethical, and political viewpoint with sensitivity and appreciation of cultural diversity. Students, while drawing upon their educational experiences, will investigate and debate current topics within the imaging sciences profession. This course will increase information literacy and professional development through scholarly research and career developing activities. Students will apply their knowledge and experiences to formulate solutions to controversial problems and issues facing an ever changing imaging science field. Prereq: RADT 196 and junior or senior standing.

SOCW 402: Social Work Practice I-Integration Seminar for Social Work Practicum I (3)  The focus is on integrating the classroom knowledge content as it relates to the issues of the field practicum. Open to social work majors only. Must be taken concurrently with SOCW 401. Prereq: senior standing and consent of the director of field. F

TECH 471:Senior Project (3,4,5, or 6)  A course which provides an opportunity for synthesis of technical, professional and general knowledge for engineering students. Problems provided by industrial sponsors are studied by small teams of students to develop solutions which solutions which incorporate consideration of engineering, economic, social, environmental, and ethical dimensions of the problems.  Formal written and oral reports to faculty, industrial sponsors, and invited guests are required. Prereq: senior standing in engineering and consent of department chair.