University of Southern Indiana

Internships

With Attorneys

Students participating in a legal internship work as interns in a law office or other law-related organizations for 150 hours. Students also must complete various academic requirements. Working in a law office or other law-related institution provides a pre-law student direct contact with the practical realities of the legal profession and the applications of law in society. This experience also helps a pre-law student decide whether to commit to law school. Thus, a legal internship is a valuable component of pre-law education. 

To qualify, students must:

  • Be of junior or senior standing
  • Be a political science major
  • Have completed at least nine hours of political science courses
  • Have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.5
  • Be able to work 10 to 12 hours per week
  • Agree to enroll for no more than 15 credit hours for internships completed during fall or spring semesters, or 6 credit hours for internships completed during summer sessions (total includes the three hours of internship credit)
  • Plan to attend law school
  • Have the consent of the instructor
  • Fulfill requirements set by USI Career Services and Internships, which can be obtained in the office in Orr Center 1012
  • Complete the Application for Approval for the internship, which includes a signed statement of compliance with these requirements.

Interns will usually receive a stipend applicable toward tuition for the internship course (three hours) and other incidental expenses, such as transportation, connected with the internship. The amount of the stipend is not a standard fee and will vary from employer to employer.

With Legislators

Students participating in a legislative internship serve as interns in the Indiana State Legislature in Indianapolis. Students must be selected by one of the party caucuses in the House or Senate. In addition to working for state legislators, students must attend a speaker series and complete various academic requirements. Serving a one-semester internship in the Indiana State Legislature provides direct experience with the realities of practical politics. The internship provides students with concrete illustrations of the political concepts and processes presented in the classroom and thus are an integral part of a student’s political education.

To qualify, students must be of junior or senior standing and have the consent of the instructor.

Depending on the amount of work required, students will earn between three and six credit hours in political science that can be counted toward the elective requirement in the political science major and toward the 300- and 400-level course work required of all graduates. Under the supervision of the instructor for the course, students will work independently on academic assignments related to the legislative process.

Students who desire to take nine credit hours during the semester they are an intern may enroll in one of several internship courses in the Communications Department. Student interns seeking more than nine credits may register for Distance Education courses offered by USI.

With Courts

Students participating in judicial internships work as interns in a court for a minimum of 150 hours of supervised, professional work. The internship experience provides students with the opportunity to master and critique social science concepts and theories pertaining to the operation of judicial bureaucracies.

To qualify, students must:

  • Be of junior or senior standing
  • Agree to enroll for no more than 15 credit hours for internships completed during fall or spring semesters, or 6 credit hours for internships completed during summer sessions (total includes the three hours of internship credit)
  • Have initial meetings with and approval front the supervising instructor and the career coordinator in Career Services and Internships
  • Be interviewed by the supervising judge
  • Fulfill requirements set by USI Career Services and Internships, which can be obtained in the office in Orr Center 1012
  • Submit a completed application and the following supporting materials:
    • A current resume
    • Transcripts from USI and all other institutions attended
    • A 500 to 700 word original essay about how the Indiana state court system should be reformed. This essay must be typed or electronically printed on white paper with one-inch margins. It must be double-spaced. The applicant's name must be centered at the top of the first page and the title of the essay must appear directly below the applicant's name.
    • A letter of recommendation from a faculty member testifying to the applicant’s academic ability, maturity, oral communication skills, written communication skills, organizational skills and motivation to succeed

  • © 2014 University of Southern Indiana
  • 8600 University Blvd.
  • Evansville, IN 47712
  • 812-464-8600
Contact Dr. Mary Hallock Morris
×
Send Email to
×