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Keynote:

Approaches Through Time, Controversial New Approaches, Ethical Implications
Lisa Seif MSW, LCSW, LCAC, CSAMS

This presentation will be a journey into the history and mystery of addiction treatment and the recovery process since the 1960’s. We are losing the war on drugs. Why? What are the implications for the social work field? We will include the effectiveness of mutual-help groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous. We will translate the implementations of evidence-based practice, addiction, and the criminal justice system along with treatment theories and the mechanisms of action. We will explore how to take personal and professional action in reducing stigma associated with addiction and mental health. Finally, we will assess recovery pathways for alcohol and drug problems across diverse populations including adults, adolescents, and families from structurally vulnerable populations.  

I’d be remiss to not mention ethics. This is a time of broken faith with the public. We are constantly taking a fresh look at ethics to gain a moral and spiritual understanding and practice. Our ethics are action based and moral in foundation. We must guard against “ethical fading.” It also involves acting in a manner consistent with what is generally regarded as good values professionally, socially, and personally. This can be challenging when working with and treating people with substance use disorders. 

If we don’t know what to do, we will continue to do what we know and what we believe. Proper and ongoing training is keeping in line with our value of expertise. Supervision creates safety for everyone along with keeping humility as a safeguard. We need to keep our high status in society by remembering 3 principles: 

  1. We work for the common good above all
  2. We elevate our profession and its reputation everywhere.
  3. We lastly concern ourselves with self-interest, career, and money 

There will be a 20-minute Q & A at the end of this presentation because Lisa strongly believes we all have a voice and need an opportunity to ask, learn, lead, listen, and laugh! 

CONCURRENT SESSIONS I

 

Social Work Learners Address Chronic Pain Management with A Collaborative-Practice Clinical Team 

Mary Shirley, MSW, LCSW;  April D. Newton, PT, DPT, PhD, FNAP

Due to the multidimensional nature of pain, effective pain management often requires collaborative approaches among healthcare professions. This workshop will present the framework for a collaborative-practice model in a comprehensive pain assessment clinic (CoPAC) where social work learners are embedded with and vital to the high functioning team. 

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will: 

  1. Identify ways to integrate social work learners with unique professions into an interprofessional education and collaborative practice specialty clinic.
  2. Describe how social work and health professions learners function as a team to screen, assess, and develop a comprehensive care plan for each patient.
  3. Develop an understanding of the benefits and challenges of implementing this model from faculty and student perspectives.

 

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Diagnosing Delusions in the Age of Fake News and Alternative Facts

Don Spears, MA, HS-BCP

In this presentation we will discuss the inherent challenges of making a diagnosis such as psychosis / delusions using DSM criteria. Cultural exemptions have always been allowed, but now, with new technology and purposely-manipulated “facts,” how do clinicians decide who is mentally ill and who is simply responding to an altered presentation of reality? 

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will: 

  1. Recognize the subjective nature of delusions and hallucinations and DSM diagnostic criteria for psychoses.
  2. Understand the social construction of “reality.”
  3. Consider how powerful social and technological factors complicate determining whether a client is truly psychotic.
  4. Brainstorm techniques that will assist clinicians in making informed, culturally-competent diagnoses.

 

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Community Update on HIV: Learning the Basics and Decreasing Stigma

Tyler Gilham, Outreach Specialist; Stecey Easley, MSW, LSW

The Stigma of HIV is a large barrier restricting access to care which hides positive progress behind a curtain of shame. We strive to tear down that curtain and shed light on the topic in an informative, fun, and interactive presentation.

Learning Objectives:

  1. At the end of this session, participants will: 
    Enhance knowledge about HIV and how transmitted
  2. Develop a base understanding about HIV care and prevention
  3. Improve community knowledge of HIV care services

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Retrospective Fatality Analysis Update to Phycological Autopsy 

Janet Schnell, MSW, LCSW; Anne Kelly, Ph.D.

RFA is a method created by leading experts in suicide postmortem research to strengthen prevention. A comprehensive review of the events surrounding an individual's death to understand better their factors, warning signs, and protective factors, and inform future prevention efforts. RFA focuses on developing actionable recommendations for prevention. 

 Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will:  

  1. Better understand risk factors for suicide ideation
  2. Increase guidance in identifying warning signs for depression
  3. Direct effective understanding of protective factors for mental health problems
  4. Inform future suicide prevention efforts
     

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Use Of Simulation in Social Work Education and Practice

Robert M. Bennett, PhD, LISW

The purpose of this workshop is to give social work educators the time and scaffold to plan initial components of a simulation. Simulations benefit both social work students and professionals to increase knowledge and improve skills, critical thinking, judgment, and self-awareness and -reflection. This workshop is both directed and open-ended. 

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will:  

  1. Create a simulation purpose and goals,
  2. Design SMART actions for the simulation, and
  3. Identify simulation placement within field, course, or training.

 

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Clinical Supervision Resources: Supervision Contracts and Goal Plans  

John Paulson ACSW, LCSW, MAC, LCAC, NCSE; Summer Wilderman, LCSW; Bonitta Rinks, LCSW, ACSW 

This workshop will focus specifically on the use of contracts and goal plans in clinical supervision. Topics addressed will include various components of supervision contracts, establishing supervision goals and development plans, and how such resources can guide and strengthen the benefits of social work supervision. 

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will:  

  1. Participants will be able to identify at least two components of supervision contracts.
  2. Participants will be able develop learning goals for development programs  

 

CONCURRENT SESSIONS II

Partnerships in Crisis Care; Social Work and Police Addressing Mental Health Crisis

Charlotte Critchfield, LCSW: Officer Mario Reid, Mental Health Liaison 

Discussion of Crisis Services and partnering with police by having trained staff ready to respond to officers when there is a person in mental health crisis. The Mobile Crisis Team responds to officers on scene to help the person receive the appropriate level of care based on their current needs.   

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will:  

  1. What are crisis services, how does it work, and how will it help.
  2. Changes to the community mental health landscape; What is a CCBHC?
  3. Community partnerships for the betterment of all; getting help where help is needed. 

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 Epigenetics and Generational Trauma:  How Nature, Nurture, and Lineage Intersect 

Holly Walther, LSW

This presentation will focus on how epigenetics and generational trauma can impact individuals, families, and society.  Participants will learn a foundational understanding of epigenetics and examine recent research in the field that suggests trauma can be inherited.  A family genogram will be completed by each participant to help them explore patterns in their family history that may be attributed to generational trauma.  Probing questions will also be used for further exploration of the topic.  Practical ideas will also be provided for participants to use with the clients and families they serve.  

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will: 

  1. Establish a foundational understanding of epigenetics
  2. Apply concepts about epigenetics and generational trauma to themselves and their families of origin
  3. Learn and utilize new ‘toolbox’ skills to help clients and families both identify and process generational trauma 

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End of Life Discussions in the Rehab Setting 

Alicia Wilderman, MHSA, CMC 

Broaching the subject of end of life with patients and families while amongst a setting designed for hope, recovery, progress, and rehabilitation.  This workshop will prepare the learner for end-of-life discussions in the rehab setting.  Patients in a rehabilitation setting begin their journey with promise and hope for recovery.  Sometimes the disease or injury process does not go as expected and these patients and families are faced with an unexpected end of life journey.  This workshop will educate the learner about the rehab setting, signs and symptoms to look for when a patient is not progressing as expected, roles of hospice and palliative care, and approaches for discussion of end of life.  The participants will pair up to engage in role play scenario discussions for two sample case studies.   

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will:  

  1. The role of advanced directives at end of life.
  2. Practical tips for end-of-life discussions.

  

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Self-Care Approaches to Prevent Burnout among Social Workers

Shani Collins Woods, Ph.D., M.S.W 

The spiritual, mental, physical, etc., commitment required to manage one’s professional and personal obligations can be overwhelming. For many social workers, the concept of work-life balance is elusive. Research studies have found that being overwhelmed and stressed can lead to compassion fatigue, burnout, and a lack of professional productivity. Because burnout can increase feelings of isolation, depression, hopelessness, and frustration among social workers, this subject matter is significant to explore. 

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will:  

  1. Explain the most salient factors that influence burnout among social workers.
  2. Describe empirically based self-care approaches to prevent burnout.
  3. Help social workers develop and implement a self-care plan of action

 

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Responding to the Invisible: Addressing Veteran Needs through Collaboration and Creativity 

Todd Burkhardt, PhD; John Keesler, PhD 

Indiana ranks #14 in the United States for highest Veteran population. This presentation will describe the invisible wounds of Veterans and explore several strategies (i.e., digital training, interprofessional practice, and arts-based activities) we have used to increase student/practitioner awareness and foster wellness among those who have served.  

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will:  

  1. To identify the invisible wounds of Veterans
  2. To understand novel ways of increasing provider skills and Veteran access to resources 

 

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Professional Development for Social Work Student Interns 

JoEllen Henson, BSW, MSW, M.S.Ed 

Field education promotes the socialization of students “to think and act like a social worker.” However, many students tend to lack the professionalism expected by their field agency sites.  This presentation will explore one department’s approach to providing professional development opportunities to social work student interns.  Participants will have an opportunity to reflect and share how this need is met in their own programs.   

 Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will:                                        

  1. Upon completion, participants will be able to define the significance of professional development opportunities for social work student interns.  
  2. Upon completion, participants will be able to describe a model for delivering professional development opportunities to social work student interns.  
  3.  Upon completion, participants will identify resources and obstacles within their own programs related to the delivery of professional development opportunities for social work student interns.   

 

CONCURRENT SESSIONS III

 

Navigating the Critical, Complex Puzzle Pieces: Field Education and Law Enforcement Partnerships 

Jennifer Hippie, LCSW, LCAC;  Serretta Gordon, MSW  

Social work and law enforcement can create positive outcomes for field education when puzzle pieces are assembled. Bridging the gap between these professions often with competing priorities, takes consideration and acknowledging realities of the bigger picture. Lessons from putting together these essential pieces to create favorable results will be shared.   

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will:  

  1. Participants will be able to describe the historical and present intersectionality and entwinement of law enforcement and social work. Participants will complete a Pre and Post Survey that captures their level of competency regarding identified objectives.
  2. Participants will be able to identify essential pre-field and ongoing practicum placement requirements for a law enforcement setting which can often have competing priorities and/or divergent goals from the profession of social work.
  3. Participants will complete a Pre and Post Survey that captures their level.
  4. Participants will be able to identify current models of social work and law enforcement collaborations and their impact/outcomes at the community and individual level. Participants will complete a Pre and Post Survey that captures their level of competency regarding identified objectives. 

 

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Data Informed Social Work Practice: A Recovery Perspective

Dr. Betty Walton, LCSW 

After reviewing behavioral health recovery principles, we will discuss how available data could be used in planning services, monitoring progress, managing programs, and improving individuals’ outcomes. Lastly, participants will examine the implications for social work practice of an adult program evaluation that identified recovery related factors. 

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will:  

  1. Participants will be able to identify three principles or dimensions related to behavioral health recovery.
  2. Participants will discuss how available information (data) is used in social work practice.
  3. Participants will examine the implications of a practice-based program evaluation for direct practice, program management, and community support.

 

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Overcoming Parent Child Contact Problems: Reunification Therapy and Therapeutic Supervised Visitation

Stephanie Brinkerhoff, JD, LCSW 

Reunification therapy and therapeutic supervised visitation are multi-faceted approaches to address the systemic nature of a child’s resistance to or rejection of a parent. The intervention includes all family members in various combinations and is appropriate for mild to moderate cases of resistance and refusal. 

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will: 

  1. Raise awareness of the impact of parent child contact problems on children;
  2. Improve understanding of reunification therapy and therapeutic supervised visitation and the interventions utilized; and
  3. Help clinicians identify what is classified as parental alienation and other situations where reunification therapy or therapeutic supervised visitation would be appropriate. 

 

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Meaning-Making Through Photovoice: An Online Group Intervention for Young Adults with Cancer 

Danielle Peterson is an Assistant Professor of Social Work 

This experiential presentation highlights mutual aid and empowerment in a group process to address the unique psychosocial challenges faced by young adults with a life-limiting illness. Narrative and meaning-making strategies in the form of photovoice, a participatory action research intervention, targeted toward young adults with cancer is discussed.   

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will:  

  1. Identify several unique psychosocial needs of young adults facing a life-limiting illness such as cancer.  
  2. Describe how sharing visuals and stories, within a facilitated group, fosters connection and empowers marginalized populations to exchange feelings, attitudes, and challenges. 
  3. Gather practical strategies for implementing an online photovoice group intervention with populations such as young adults or those with life-limiting medical conditions. 

 

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Chuckles, Giggles and Laughter:  Stress Management 

Ronald Dolan, BA, MSW, EdD 

 The use of humor is a way to promote mental and physical Health.  Humor has been viewed as a way of looking at a situation from a different point of view, diffusing a crisis and providing opportunity for increased insight.  A sense of humor is a powerful stress coping behavior.  

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will:  

  1. Participants will become familiar with practical ideas on how to show a sense of humor.
  2. Participants will understand how humor affects your physical and mental health;
  3. Participants will identify specific humor skills to relieve stress to prevent burnout.

 

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Social Work, Interprofessional Education, and Interagency Collaborations Create Unique Learning Opportunities for Students

Carlene Quinn: LCSW, ACSW; Alex Buchanan, MA; April D. Newton, PT, DPT, PhD, FNAP 

This workshop provides strategies used to implement an interprofessional education program with learners and community partners. Social work learners collaborated with other learners from criminal justice, education, nursing, and public health. The interagency collaborations enhanced the program using subject matter experts delivering content related to substance use disorder. 

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will: 

  1. Discuss strategies to promote the development of a co-curricular interprofessional education program.
  2. Identify how to collaborate with external agencies and stakeholders to deliver an interprofessional education program for social work and unique learners.
  3. Generate topic ideas related to a public health issue for unique learners to engage in interprofessional education. 

 

Data Informed Social Work Practice: A Recovery Perspective

Dr. Betty Walton, LCSW

After reviewing behavioral health recovery principles, we will discuss how available data could be used in planning services, monitoring progress, managing programs, and improving individuals’ outcomes. Lastly, participants will examine the implications for social work practice of an adult program evaluation that identified recovery related factors.

Learning Objectives:

At the end of this session, participants will: 

Participants will be able to identify three principles or dimensions related to behavioral health recovery.

  1. Participants will discuss how available information (data) is used in social work practice.
  2. Participants will examine the implications of a practice-based program evaluation for direct practice, program management, and community support.