University of Southern Indiana

Robert Owen 250th Virtual Conversation

All events will follow University of Southern Indiana COVID-19 guidelines.

Fruits of Failure: Lasting Legacy of the Owen-Maclure Community of New Harmony, Indiana
Monday April 26 at 1:00-2:00 p.m.
Dr. Bill Elliot

In January 1826, the passengers of the Philanthropist arrived in New Harmony, Indiana to participate in a social experiment led by Robert Owen and William Maclure focusing on communal living. Although this experiment dissolved by 1828, the community continued to innovate through art, education, music, printing, scientific investigation, and social justice. Specifically, the children of Robert Owen found success in a diversity of endeavors, attracting many well-known artistic, political, and scientific influencers of the day.

Dr. William Elliott earned a B.S. degree in Geology (1995) from the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown, and a M.S. (1998) and Ph.D. (2002) in Geology from Indiana University. He started his teaching career at Southern Oregon University in 2002 and joined the Geology and Physics Department at the University of Southern Indiana in August 2009 as Chair. Since 2009, Dr. Elliott has developed a passion for the history and philosophy of Geology, and in particular, the historical significance of New Harmony, Indiana to scientific investigations conducted in the mid-nineteenth century. In 2014, Dr. Elliott installed a new museum exhibit entitled "New Harmony, Indiana: Crossroads of Geology" at the Working Men's Institute unveiled at the town’s Bicentennial Celebration. This work is supported from generous funding from Historic New Harmony and the Bigham Award of Historic Southern Indiana. Dr. Elliott also serves as a member of the Board of Directors of Historic New Harmony and continues to be engaged with research highlighting the historical significance of New Harmony.

See the presentation here.

 

Painting the Great Window
Thursday May 20 at 1:00-2:00 p.m.
Matthew J. Mosca

Learn more about the recently restored fan window that sat above the Door of Promise at the Harmonist Brick Church as well as other examples of surviving finishes in New Harmony's historical buildings from historic paint researcher, Matthew J. Mosca.

Matthew J. Mosca, is a nationally recognized consultant in the field of historic paint research and restoration, employing microscopy, ultraviolet light exposure and microchemical testing as a means of identifying the constituents of paint finishes. He received his education at Cornell University, the Graduate School of the Department of Agriculture and the McCrone Research Institute and was a National Trust scholar of the Attingham School, Attingham England in 1978. Several projects have won awards for excellence over the years, and some, such as Mount Vernon and Hope Lodge, where the technology of the eighteenth century was replicated as accurately as possible, have been considered landmarks in the evolution of the field.

Register here. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting.

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