University of Southern Indiana

Twin Swamps

 

 Featherfoil        Feathered Lily
 

 A Guide to the Wildflowers
of

Twin Swamps
Nature Preserve
in
Posey County, Indiana

 
     
      

 

Guide to Flowers
(hundreds of photos!)

Trail Map
(links to plenty
of pictures)

Hike the Trail
(a virtual tour of
Twin Swamps)

 Bluebell Field Big

Plant Lists
Alphabetized by
Botanical names
Common names

 
 
 

This Web site was created to help you identify the many wildflowers that grow at Twin Swamps Nature Preserve, which is in the southwest tip of Indiana, where the Wabash River flows into the Ohio.


 

 

 

Twin Swamps was established in 1987 by Indiana's Department of Natural Resources to help save the state's dwindling population of bald cypress trees. The 500-acre site is home to a wide variety of plants, including the large spread of Virginia bluebells shown here.


 

 

     

 

 

A Guide to the Flowers

Thumbnail photos of more than a hundred types of wildflowers at Twin Swamps will be found on the Web pages listed below. Please click on the thumbnails to see full-sized pictures and information on the flowers. To help you find specific flowers, the pictures are organized by season, by habitat and by color.

 

By season

Early Spring (March-April) 
Late Spring (May-June)
Summer (Late June-July)
Late Summer (August-October)

 

By habitat

Field
Low, wet woods
Low, dry woods
High, dry woods
Cypress swamp

 

By color

White flowers 
Yellow flowers
Red and pink flowers
Blue flowers
Green and tan flowers

For more information on finding flowers, please see This Is How I've Arranged the Photos

 

More swamp things

Along the Trail

Cypress Trees

Scenes from the Boardwalk

Birds

Mushrooms

Insects


Twin Swamps is a quiet and wild place, a place of remarkable diversity that contrasts sharply with the order and monotony of the surrounding fields of corn and soybean and sorghum. It’s a place that has been given over to the plants and insects and birds, a place where we can watch in minute detail as nature recycles itself, as things grow and die and decay and replenish the soil and are born again.


Photography and text
by
Rick Mark
of
New Harmony, Indiana

 If you have questions or comments, please write to Rick Mark at:

rick.mark1217@gmail.com

This Web site would not have been possible without the support
of the Biology and Liberal Studies departments at the University of Southern Indiana,
the Indiana Department of Natural Resources' Division of Nature Preserves,
and the Indiana Academy of Science.

Copyright 1999 by Rick Mark
All photographs on this Web site are the property of Rick Mark
and may not be copied or used without his permission.

 

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